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$.50 2X6 Paddle

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
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A "bright" idea gone dim. Thought I would make a short double paddle to ease the boat along while fishing. Could be used as a single paddle but would not have to swap sides of boat. Just pick it up and paddle on which ever side of the boat you needed to. Did not work too well in practice. Not the first time my ideas didn't pan out. It was still a lot of fun to make and I need the practice. 2X6 cost $.50 from the cut off bin so no big loss.



I thought it looked good on the boat.


Only thing lost was time, but what is time to a paddle? :roll:

beekeeper
 

Wannabe

Well-Known Member
Apr 5, 2007
2,645
2
on the bank of Trinity Bay
Go ahead J.D. spend another $.50. Ya know your going to have fun with it. :D Could your grandson use the paddle as is or would you have to trim it down a little? It may not do what you intended, but it still looks good.
Bob
 

Kayak Jack

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Aug 26, 2003
13,976
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Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Another thought, it is about the length of an Inuit paddle. Narrow up the blades and let the Grandkids use it.

I suppose you could use it to eat ice cream too. I'm thinking, J.D., that you could easily handle a double ender with ice cream. :roll:
 

gbinga

Well-Known Member
Nov 7, 2008
736
2
Hoschton, GA
I agree with the other guys - a perfectly reasonable looking paddle except for the length.

You need a board stretcher. The power operated ones are too damn expensive except for industrial applications, but the manual versions are reasonable and a great thing to have around the shop. You should be able to find one at Harbor Freight or Home Depot. Gotta ask for it in person, though. You'll never find it on the internet.

George
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,838
52
I know it is too short to be used as a double kayak or Inuit paddle. The thought process was for it to be a double ended paddle used as a single paddle over either side of the boat with out having to switch the paddle from one side to the other, or to use it one handed for a single stroke to ease the boat along as I fished. It workd, but not as well as I wanted. A lighter and/or narrower design may be better.
I like Jack's ice cream idea. :)

beekeeper
 

Kayak Jack

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Aug 26, 2003
13,976
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Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
gbinga said:
You need a board stretcher. The power operated ones are too damn expensive except for industrial applications, but the manual versions are reasonable and a great thing to have around the shop. You should be able to find one at Harbor Freight or Home Depot. Gotta ask for it in person, though.
In our Harbor Freight, board stretchers are right next to the post holes.

Just think, J.D., you could eat ice cream from TWO each 5 gallon pails. One on your left, and another on your right. (little blonde gal on Hee Haw: "YUM! YUM! Grandpa - What's fer supper?"

Being serious for a moment, there are one-handed paddles that may work. About 10" X 18", with a comma-shaped hand hold and a thumb hole cut out of one end. Making one of them would cost, oh maybe, 37 or 38 cents. (I'll email you the money.)
 

beekeeper

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Mar 4, 2009
1,838
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Kayak Jack said:
gbinga said:
Being serious for a moment, there are one-handed paddles that may work. About 10" X 18", with a comma-shaped hand hold and a thumb hole cut out of one end. Making one of them would cost, oh maybe, 37 or 38 cents. (I'll email you the money.)
I'll hijack or drift my on post. I have seen those thumb paddles. They may work but, not in the manor I envisoned. A lot of pirogue paddlers around Lake Bistaneau use two short (36" or less) paddles. One in each hand, (thumb on top side of fist) held at the shaft next to the blade. The stroke is a grubbing motion (reach forward, stab paddle into the water and pull rearward), alternating left and right stokes. Only one paddle is used when casting or other activities. I don't have any pictures but I will try to get some and post. I did not explain this well, but the two short paddles in this picture are being made for that usage:


:wink: Jack these cut off boards are more expensive. Each paddle has $1.02 worth of wood. I was kind of nervous getting started. :roll:

beekeeper
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
I have a little paddle about 3 feet in length and I paddle with it the same way. Hold the top of the shaft in your hand with the thumb on the upper part to brace it and pull back on the paddle.
You can do it with a regular paddle but it is a little more awkward to use.

Chuck.
 

beekeeper

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Mar 4, 2009
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Seems I was closer to having something worth while than I thought. I don't know where this paddle is today. I don't want to make another, but it does look like it could have worked. I just did not know the proper technique. Anybody know about Storm Paddles? Your thoughts.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
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Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
A storm paddle is just a shorter Greenland paddle. Greenland paddle blabes are historically long and narrow. Trees were conspicuous by their absence in Greenland. Only driftwood, whale bones, etc were available.
Paddles are a personal choice. I am not a fan of traditional Greenland paddles. I find them to be not as effective as a better designed paddle is.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
559
22
79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
I have a little paddle about 3 feet in length and I paddle with it the same way. Hold the top of the shaft in your hand with the thumb on the upper part to brace it and pull back on the paddle.
You can do it with a regular paddle but it is a little more awkward to use.

Chuck.
I use two short paddles, unless I’m going a long distance. one paddle under each elbow. I fish using a paddle in one hand, and a pole in the other, to cast and fish I put the paddle in a holder one the outside of the tumblehome. I like to jig fish with a paddle in one hand and a jig pole in the other. Kind’a like the picture of this handsome young man!

 

beekeeper

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Mar 4, 2009
1,838
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Any pictures of the paddle holders? The single paddle worked well when using my fly rod but not so well for casting and retrieving. Placing the paddle in the boat or across the gunnels for each cast was too much trouble and water in the boat. Using the double paddle with one hand for small corrective is tiresome.
 

oldbuffpilot

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May 13, 2014
559
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Central Kansas and Central Texas
JD,
Here are some pictures of various paddle holders I have used. Before the SS&G Boats , I would screw or bolt my paddle holders to the side or tumble home. The holders were kinda flexible to keep from breaking, usually perforated metal plumbers tape or 14# romex. I cover the “metal tape” with duck tape or foam weather stripping to take off the sharp edge. Now all my newer boats have the slotted inwhale which makes it handy to remove for transport, especially stacking boats.

Not a good picture but shows the hooked shape holders on my Water Moccasins (above picture)




This picture shows how the metal tape holders are bent around the inwhale which works good for me.


single paddle holder

I prefer the 2.5’ paddle for using two paddles. Same paddle most all the camps on Bistineau used to carry to scull john boats. Just the way I learned and I use two paddles most of the time, except for longer
distances.

Fish more! :)


Any pictures of the paddle holders? The single paddle worked well when using my fly rod but not so well for casting and retrieving. Placing the paddle in the boat or across the gunnels for each cast was too much trouble and water in the boat. Using the double paddle with one hand for small corrective is tiresome.








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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,838
52
Thanks for the pictures. I like the removable part.
I made these two "short" paddles with the idea of using them as you described.
They are 36" long and have "oversized" grips for my large paws. Do you thing they are too long? If I shorten them by cutting the grips off, would they still work?
IMG_4030.JPG
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
559
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79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
That's kind'a hard to say, I've considered trying 3' paddles but decided they would be too long. I'm sure that cutting off the top grip would not work. I use the knob to "hook" on my arm just below the elbow. This morning I was starting to repair a pair of 2.5' paddles and was trying to figure out how to turn the knob into more of a hook. Jack once made reference to a similar paddle for sculling.
I'm toying with the idea and build a pair with at least a wider knob. Just resistiing making a paddle :)
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
559
22
79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Took some pictures, which may explain better than words.

This works fine for me, however the 2.5 ‘ paddles now cost about $30 each with shipping! I may have to break down and build some. If I do I would make the grip longer (horizontally) so my elbow would tuck behind it better.

 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,838
52
One possibility would to cut the grip off, turn the shaft round on the end, then bore a hole into a dowel to make a T grip. It could be made as long as you needed it and it could even be asymmetrical if that would help. If you didn't use glue it could be changed out until you figured out what size worked best.