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A Long Way Around, a Pirouge Build

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
Andy and Joey's last builds contributed to my journey down this road. Many ways to build a pirogue. All have their plus's and minus's. Too much typing to go down that road here.
I like to put the chine log on the floor and set the rocker as I want. The sides are fitted to the bottom and trimed flush. I do not have to have a side pattern or jigs for each design I choose to build. The draw back is the chine log has to be hand fitted(planed or sanded) to the flare or the sides. The angle changes on each end, so the sides can come together at the stems.
I decided to develop a side pattern and jigs ( actually forms and stations on a strong-back ) to build a pirogue shaped like my "truck" boat. To do this I started by building a boat out of luan and fitted temporary forms inside it at one foot intervals.
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This gave me a pattern for my sides.
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I made three sides before I got the shape ( visual lines) I wanted. Had to reset up the stations on the strong-back.
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
Joey you may have time to finish a couple boats by the time this adventure is over.
The forms I fitted to the luan boat were made from left over scrap wood, so I had to make new ones that would fit the strong-back.
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Each one had to be notched for the chine log.
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I made covers for the notches so the forms could be used for strip building. It would even work for stitch and glue builds.
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
After mounting the forms to the stations they were adjusted for level and rocker using the luan side for a pattern.
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Next I glued the chine logs to the plywood sides copied from the luan pattern. After the glue dried they were turned over and nailed with 3/4" stainless ring shank nails.
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
This where the long way around starts. Tried to place the plywood sides onto the forms and it will not fit. Problem turns out to be that plywood fares different than luan. Seedtick said it is same issue with building with lumber. You can't copy a plywood design because the boards don't bend the same as plywood.
To finish the boat I switched to traditional "by hand and eye". Used a couple of the forms as jigs to spread the sides and then nailed the bottom on.
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Turned the boat over and installed the tumblehome supports, then used a batten to shape the pannels.
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seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,148
4
Denham Springs, LA
No bottom ribs? Or am I just missing seeing them?

BTW I admire your willingness to continue trying something new. Now you understand why the boatbuilders who had to make a living building boats only built one style
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
I will install at least one bottom rib, it's location determined by where the new chair fits. If the floor isn't stiff enough after that I will add another one. So far I have not had an issue doing it that way.
I only started this adventure to get an accurate pattern so I could build in the traditional manner and overcome the issue I have with the progressive bevel on the side of my chine logs. I will correct the forms so they fit the plywood sides.
I'm glad I don't have to build the same boat over and over. I enjoy different, and the challenge of making it work.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
342
9
77
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Thanks for posting. I've got to think about your approach and learn from it. The chine angle was my undoing when tried the method. I was surprised, because on the 4H boats we used to cut the Chines at the same angle full lengthl. Now I'm confused :)
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
Thanks for posting. I've got to think about your approach and learn from it. The chine angle was my undoing when tried the method. I was surprised, because on the 4H boats we used to cut the Chines at the same angle full lengthl. Now I'm confused :)
You can cut the chines at the same angle full length if you build traditional, sides together and spread befor adding the bottom. You simply plane the logs flat before attaching the floor. You also have to have a pattern or plans to set the shape of the sides to get a particular shape and rocker you want. Depending on the shape of the boat and If the sides are somewhat vertical say 20 deg. or less the plywood may torture together at the stems, with out changing the angle of the log at the ends..
When I attach the log to the floor first I have to plane a progressive bevel by eye. and trial and error to fit the sides. Not impossible but I would like a more precise way to work it.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
More work and a little progress. Installed the top rail. It is a little different from some I have made but I was pleased with its look.
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I have been lax in taking pictures so I will have to post more later. The boat is painted and waiting for the bottom protection.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,576
18
Thanks Joey. Chuck is wright, you can't have too many. For a time I searched hard for bargains, and used coupons, and gift cards to get enough. I Don't remember why so many in this picture, but I tend to overdo.