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A new pirogue project in Tallahassee

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,714
113
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Good dogs become one with us. When I got a cut, scrape, whatever, Tippy would lick it clean and it healed. Since then I’ve heard conflicting theories about letting a dog lick open wounds. All I can say is, it worked for me. Go figure.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
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69
Good dogs become one with us. When I got a cut, scrape, whatever, Tippy would lick it clean and it healed. Since then I’ve heard conflicting theories about letting a dog lick open wounds. All I can say is, it worked for me. Go figure.
I always allowed it. Never had a problem. They say it is a bad idea.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,226
72
77
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
I always allowed it. Never had a problem. They say it is a bad idea.
Everything from our childhood was a bad idea ( today ) but was OK Back then. The last laugh is ours since we survived our childhoods and are still around today. I like to think even tougher because of it. Heck we even make boats out of wood and skip the yuppy ( production line ) ones.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
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69
I am really realizing just how much I appreciate having my dog here by my side. She wants to be at my with me all the time and it is such a comfort in what have been difficult times. As I mentioned elsewhere she just had her spleen removed and may be on borrowed time now.

One of he reason for building this pirogue is that the Wenonah's round slippery bottom didn't suit her lack of surefooted-ness in her advancing years and I thought the flat bottom and a matte finish would help.

A likely outcome is that we have a couple months with her, but we have no guarantee of even that. If it turns out that it wasn't malignant she could make it much longer, but the majority of spleen tumors in dogs are apparently malignant, We have to wait for possibly as long as 2 weeks for the pathology report and they are apparently wrong 10-20% of the time so even them we won't really know what to expect for sure. We will just enjoy her as long as we can and as long as she is comfortable and has a decent quality of life. I dread the hard choices and the ultimate loss. It will absolutely break my heart when she is gone.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
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Marley is recovering very well from her splenectomy. Keeping her from doing too much is the chore at this point. She is feeling well enough that we can all enjoy each other's company. As long as no other conditions hit her we are golden. Fingers crossed that nothing has metastasized or at least if it has that we have some good time with her left.

Back to the pirogue... I rough cut the shape of the middle sheet of the bottom and the little end panels of the bottom. I was able to get the pieces with room for scarf joints with good usage of the plywood, so I will go ahead and scarf it rather than use butt joints.
 

seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,154
4
Denham Springs, LA
Glad to see you willing to try scarfing, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed

theres is always more than one way to skin a cat, here’s what I do using sawdust filled epoxy as glue"......

I scarf both matching pieces at the same time, I feel it’s easier to scarf one 1/2” thickness than two 1/4” thicknesses (assuming 1/4” plywood).

I like an 8 to one scarf, so for 1/4”, back up the panel on top 2”. Use the lines in the plywood as horizontal markers, when they’re parallel, you have an even scarf.

the scarfs are essentially end grain so they will soak up a good bit. Pass some unfilled epoxy over the scarf area before using the filled epoxy for glue up. Don’t skimp on filled epoxy, better to have to scrape some off than try to fill in an empty joint. Be careful when you overlap the joint. Overlap too much and you can starve the joint. I actually pull the joint back just a bit so I’m assured that when the clamps are applied I cannot starve the joint. Oh and don’t forget to put waxed paper on boths sides of the joint so you donthave to pry it your workbench
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
72
0
69
Glad to see you willing to try scarfing, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed

theres is always more than one way to skin a cat, here’s what I do using sawdust filled epoxy as glue"......

I scarf both matching pieces at the same time, I feel it’s easier to scarf one 1/2” thickness than two 1/4” thicknesses (assuming 1/4” plywood).

I like an 8 to one scarf, so for 1/4”, back up the panel on top 2”. Use the lines in the plywood as horizontal markers, when they’re parallel, you have an even scarf.

the scarfs are essentially end grain so they will soak up a good bit. Pass some unfilled epoxy over the scarf area before using the filled epoxy for glue up. Don’t skimp on filled epoxy, better to have to scrape some off than try to fill in an empty joint. Be careful when you overlap the joint. Overlap too much and you can starve the joint. I actually pull the joint back just a bit so I’m assured that when the clamps are applied I cannot starve the joint. Oh and don’t forget to put waxed paper on boths sides of the joint so you donthave to pry it your workbench
Thanks. I scarfed the joints on the sides and that is pretty much how I did them.