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Anchoring when fishing

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
146
2
69
Tallahassee Florida
I assume that some kind of anchoring system is going to be pretty vital for pirogue fishing. It looks like many (most) use some kind of trolley. I have to wonder if some of the systems aren't a bit overbuilt and/or overengineered for the kind of use they will see on most pirogues. I am assuming generally sheltered conditions, shallow water, and not very fast current will be the typical usage. Otherwise I'd choose a different boat (I own a canoe as well).

So with that in mind it seems to me as if nice pulleys may be purely optional. I am wondering why a system that amounted to a couple loops of paracord through the same holes as the bow loops with rings on them instead of pulleys wouldn't be adequate. I figure that to start with I could try using rings cut from pvc pipe instead of pulleys. They might wear out too quickly, but if so they'd at least serve for a test of proof of concept.

I recall seeing a diy cleat made of pvc pipe that might round out this low cost setup. The whole project could probably be done with stuff on hand.

What do you guys use for a trolley if you use one? What kind of anchor? I'd imagine something pretty minimal would be okay. It might even be nice if it was easy to drag it intentionally.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,184
24
South Louisiana
Pete, I never tried the trolley system. It seemed too cumbersome to me. My favorite is a 3-5# anchor dropped over the side with a single wrap around a jam cleat. 5 seconds to drop anchor and fasten. Maybe 10 seconds to weigh anchor. A handy item is a cleat attached to the inside gunnel at arms length in front of and behind your seat. With the rope coming from the anchor, around that cleat and back to your jam cleat, any current or wind will make the boat trail out from the anchor pointed in the best position for fishing. MUCH better than trying to paddle in between casts. The bonus is I've found I tend to cast more at the fishy spot and end up with more fish.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
146
2
69
Tallahassee Florida
Pete, I never tried the trolley system. It seemed too cumbersome to me. My favorite is a 3-5# anchor dropped over the side with a single wrap around a jam cleat. 5 seconds to drop anchor and fasten. Maybe 10 seconds to weigh anchor. A handy item is a cleat attached to the inside gunnel at arms length in front of and behind your seat. With the rope coming from the anchor, around that cleat and back to your jam cleat, any current or wind will make the boat trail out from the anchor pointed in the best position for fishing. MUCH better than trying to paddle in between casts. The bonus is I've found I tend to cast more at the fishy spot and end up with more fish.
Sounds like that gives you much of what the trolley does without the fine tuning which apparently you find unnecessary. I have a feeling that I might as well in the kind of conditions I plan to use the pirogue. There is a lot to be said for keeping things simple.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
146
2
69
Tallahassee Florida
Anyone use a stake out pole instead of an anchor some or all of the time? I see some mention elsewhere of using a fiberglass pole from the walmart garden section to make a diy one. Seems like it would be quick and easy and work well in shallow water and muddy or sandy bottoms, which would cover most of the conditions I have seen here so far where I am likely to fish.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
436
13
77
Central Kansas and Central Texas
I think Joey has a good idea about the 2 cleats. I use an anchor Trolley while fishing brush piles in lakes. I also use my trolley while in brush piles I could move it back-and-forth and move around without changing my tire
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,277
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Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
I like to drift and fish. Serves a couple of benefits , I don't disturb anything. Then when I hook onto that monster he can tow me back to the landing area before I land him and let him loose.;):rolleyes:o_O

Not me but Vince hooked a big one and it towed him about a couple of miles out into the Gulf of Mexico. A camping , paddling , trip in the Everglades Nation Park when all of this happen.
Vince and the fish finally got back to the North Cape and land. He landed the fish and then gave it a bear hug ( in the surf ) while taking a picture ( selfe ) of the shark and himself. The Shark was a good 7 or 8 feet long.
Later I asked him what would he of done if that shark bite him while posing for the picture. He explained he and the shark was to tired to do much of anything , Anyway they both returned to their natural environments and enjoyed life.
 
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jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,184
24
South Louisiana
I tried drifting, but it seems all I get is one, MAYBE two good casts to a likely spot before it's gone. I like to hang around a good spot a little longer and cast to the bank and try different retrieves. I'll even cast parallel to the bank out in deeper water and let my fly sink down to 4 feet or so. I've found the biggest bluegills hang out in that deeper water.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,675
37
I don't care for anchoring to fish. For me it seems more trouble than it is worth. I find fishing into the wind and/or current gives me better boat control. I usually can cast to a location a couple of times before drifting back. A paddle stroke or two and I'm back into position.
A short length of chain makes a good pirogue anchor. Laying on the bottom it will usually hold you in one place. Pull it up some until the boat moves and it controls the drift.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
146
2
69
Tallahassee Florida
A short length of chain makes a good pirogue anchor. Laying on the bottom it will usually hold you in one place. Pull it up some until the boat moves and it controls the drift.
I suspect that the chain idea might work well enough for a lot of conditions where I am likely to fish. I like that it easily would stow nicely in a drawstring bag. How much chain do you use? How heavy of a chain?

I also figure that when a real anchor is required it works better with a section of chain. Whether or not a real anchor will be needed much where I use the pirogue remains to be seen, but even if it isn't the anchor line might be used on more than one boat. So carrying the bag with line and chain between boats would be handy. It could be used with or without anchor depending on the boat/conditions. I think I'll give the chain a try and see how it goes.

As far as raising lowering the chain to control drift speed I'd imagine that would require fairly steady depth to be useful. Still might be useful some of the places where I will fish given that they are mostly shallow.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,838
141
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
On Michigan rivers, a lot of fishing boats drag a chunk of log chain about 4’-5’ long on a rope. It gives either a fairly stout anchor that may slowly creep, or if raised “a bit” will give a partially arrested downstream drift. It also serves to keep the boat streamlined in the current. Most Michigan rivers have a current of about 2mph-5mph. A chain is “snag resistant” as they usually just ride over or around obstructions.

On Louisiana rivers, you could probably just use a watch fob chain to slow or stop a boat? ;-)
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,675
37
Not sure what technical size the chain was. I would describe it as logging chain size. If you know what weight anchor you need then use about that much weight chain. Mine was about 3' long. Worked well controlling drift on the lake while fishing in the wind. No drastic change in depth there.
The chain has little grabbing force but also does not get stuck in roots or debris very easily.
Be careful anchoring in much current in a pirouge, it could cause you to capsize. The bayous I fish can have some current , but if it is moving the boat fast enough to keep you from fishing it is probably at flood stage or too shallow to fish.
Where Joey fishes current is called tide, incoming or outgoing.
 
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jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,184
24
South Louisiana
I find, even with zero current, a pirogue will continue to move even when you stop paddling unless you make an effort to stop all motion. It will slowly turn out of position or ease on past the perfect spot. I flyfish mostly, so I need to be a little more fussy about boat position. My thing is, casting 10 times around a good spot will many times yield more fish than one or two casts, if indeed, it is a good enough spot to fish.