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AUTUMN'S FALLING

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,113
79
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
. . . . . . and, now some leaves are flying. A good sized shagbark hickory is behind my kitchen window; another smaller one is out front. Black walnut trees are neighbors a couple-three hundred yards yonder. Fox squirrels, and smaller black squirrels, are scampering all around, gathering nuts.

Abundant rains have kept grass a rich green, and most of the leaves are too. But, there are always the early adapters, in a hurry to be among the first. Leaves on cottowoods are dry, and getting brittle. They have a different sound as the wind rattles through the trees. No more, the gentle rustle in a breeze. Now it sounds as though leaves are made of hard metal, stone, and baked porcelain. Sharp clicks, ticks, and snappy sounds echo around the trees. Mornings have a bite to them. Autumn is falling.m
 
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oldyaker

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
1,861
5
Yer right as rain Jack! Yesterday and the past week it’s been 90 everyday. Today we rose to 60 degrees... wonderful! Autumn has always been a magical time of year for myself. Looks like we’ll have lows of 40’s and 60’s for highs the remainder of the month. The trees are just starting to put on an impressive color show starting mid month. Time to think about a pot O chili!
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
Weather is about the same here except it has been in the upper 80's which is nicer then the upper 90's. Got tired of waiting for cooler weather so yesterday I made a big pot of Chili. Real Chili without any pineapple in it. I'm a Texan and always thought Pineapples belong over on some island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. :D
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,909
38
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
Not sure but a combination of ...Fish chunks , diced potatoes , onions , butter , milk or cream , celery and garlic if desired.
Back 100 years ago ( or so ) we use to get *periwinkle's* over at the beach. We would rinse them in the serf to get a lot of the sand out of them. Then into some salted ( we used water from the surf ) boiling water and when the shells opened the meat would separate. We would sift out the shells and set the periwinkles and some of the liquid aside. Cook up some diced potatoes, onion and celery in the cast iron skillet. When that was cooked add the periwinkle meat back to the pan along with a little of the water then milk and butter to make a chowder. Salt & Pepper to taste. Get it nice and hot and enjoy lunch. We would have plenty for Mom , Dad and myself and everything was cooked on a Coleman 2 burner camping stove. A nice hot lunch was always welcome on a surf fishing trip.
I would have second thoughts about doing that lunch today with all the pollution out there.

Why not do the same with small cut pieces of fish but put the fish in last since it does not take a long time to cook , especially small diced pieces of a fillet.

*** Periwinkles are small ( about finger nail size ) clam like critters that live in the beach sand buy the water line. They are easy to spot as a wave goes back out to sea. Back then they were normally is a group about the size ( length & width ) of the normal vehicle , sometimes even larger groups. They were easy to get , just dip into the sand and get a handful.
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Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,113
79
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Once, in northern Japan, I had a crew recovering wreckage of one of our F-100s that had augered into the surf, going in just over a small, fishing village. One day at lunch time, one of the Japanese hauled an oblong rock out of the water. It was about 8-10 feet out away from the beach. The rock was covered with long, green moss - and about 25-30 razor clams. When twisted off the rock, and laid into our small campfire, they opened right up. Hauled out of the fire, we sucked the meat right out of the shell. JARVIS good eatin!

And, about as fresh as you can get. They went well with some green onions liberated from a nearby garden.
 

oldyaker

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
1,861
5
MAN LAW.... Don’t fruit the beer! Or the chili!
People will look at you funny.
 

oldyaker

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
1,861
5
I know ‘maters are classified as fruit... didn’t know about peppers being fruit.
“Is Pineapple a Fruit or a Vegetable? Pineapples fall into the category of fruits. ... Since the technical definition of a vegetable is the edible part of a plant, pineapples qualify as that distinction, but by that definition, all fruits are vegetables.”Feb 10, 2019
https://www.organicfacts.net
Anyway.... had some fantastic local fresh apple cider with my first pot of Autumn chili today! Cools the fire provided by the chili peppers.
Are sweet peppers fruit since their sweet? Their not a root vegetable so it must be fruit!
Anyway the apple cider is wonderful this year!
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,113
79
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Fruits traditionally come from a woody-stemmed plant, IE a tree. Usually, they are a seed pod of the plant. Tomatoes don't fully meet the definition of either fruit or vegetable. They're mostly all good.
Sprouts of most plants, usually supply some of the best that the plant has to offer. But, potato sprouts are poisonous. As are apple seeds.