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Bayou Dorcheat Pirogue #3

beekeeper

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Mar 4, 2009
1,850
52
Tweeked my last pirogue' dimensons a little. Hopefully the changes will allow me to sit behind center some and still have the boat trimed correctly. It will be a couple weeks befor I can try it.
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oldsparkey

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Aug 25, 2003
10,446
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Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
That's one sharp looking boat. As far as the seating you can always counter balance it with the fish you catch. I can't think of any reason why no self respecting fish would not want to be seen n that boat. Now we just might know your secret to catching all those fish.
 

beekeeper

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Mar 4, 2009
1,850
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Thanks Chuck.
Ever since I made my son the first "Bayou Dorcheat" pirogue he has been out fishing me. Must be the boat, right?:rolleyes: Built #2 for me but that didn't help. If this one does not work only thing left to do is copy his exactly or repossess it.:)
 

beekeeper

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Mar 4, 2009
1,850
52
I am excited about this boat. Not sure if my little changes will be enough to allow me to sit behind center as far back as I would like. That will be ok because what I have now works. I'm getting about as much out of this size boat as one could expect. It is 13' long with a 12' X 28" floor, and 34" beam.

A secondary goal was to build lighter. My experiences has shown me it is hard to build a full grown pirogue with traditional methods and materials below 50 lbs. Fiberglass and extra light weight wood can give you a lighter boat. This boat weighs 40.2 lbs. That is 11 lbs. lighter than my son's boat that is 6" shorter.

For this build I found and used "Exterior" Luan plywood. https://www.stinehome.com/building-materials/plywood/sanded/
When I found this plywood at the store I was skeptical. Store manager checked their info and said it was rated exterior. Gave me some small scraps of 9mm and I did a boil test. It did not come apart. I used the 5.2mm for the sides and 9mm for the floor. After I bought the sheets I boiled a sample of the 5.2mm. It also held together.

Can't say this will work in the real world but I was confident enough to build with it. I will post any problems or developments if they happen.
 
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,850
52
The "whale tail" batter board at the stern was not as pointed/sharp as the other boat. Not sure these pictures show it clear enough, but it has a sharp edge a few inches up from the bottom but tapers to a rounded over profile at the top.
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Trying to keep the boat short as possible, I did not rake this transom as much as the other boat. Increasing the rake or the batter board's thickness would have lengthened the sharp edge. It should still aid in the reduction of turbulence.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,850
52
Took the boat fishing yesterday for it's first time. We only caught 5 small bass, but I am still very happy. I only caught one so the boat will need more trips for a proper slimming. One trip is seldom enough to make firm opinions about performance but I am very pleased for now.
I was able to sit behind center and keep my rods in front of me out of the way and easily accessible. This was one of the main goals.The changes worked. Another goal was to increase the capacity so the boat so it would ride higher at the stern. The modified transom did the trick. There may be some loss of paddling efficiency but not enough to notice.
It paddled easy and turned well. The boat appeared to touch the surface at the bow, and draft 3" to 4" at the stern. When I shifted the load forward the bow stem submerged a little and did not sway (chine walk?). That was encroaching on my rods and gear"s space so I stayed back. It was fine for fishing paddling.
The boat's lightweight was the icing on the cake. The 9 mm floor felt very rigid and the 5 mm sides seem to be strong enough.
I will try some more experimenting with seat locations and height the next trip. Right now the 8" high seat felt the best. Not for stability but it lowered my legs and allowed my knees to lean against the combing. The center of the seat is 18' behind center as is the widest beam.
 
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jdupre'

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Sep 9, 2007
2,315
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South Louisiana
I'd say you have the design about perfected. IF you wanted to pick the stern up some, you could make it wider and/or add more flair behind center. That may create a bit more resistance, but there are almost no free lunches in boat design.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,850
52
Not much "wider or flared more" left on the bone. Any more and the design will have to become a skiff or something else. Moving the widest beam a little more aft and reducing the bow rocker to near zero may help. I am not dissatisfied with the boat. It will take a few more trips to get an accurate assessment.
"no free lunches in boat design." is so true. Like a plate lunch at a deli, the more we add or change the more it cost. You can only have so much on the plate before something falls off or mixes together.
For my use, a 14' x 26" pirogue using modern materials and methods would be hard to beat. Lighter folks could get by with shorter. Hard to design better than tradition and evolution. Those designs are what they are because they work. Part of the evolution is today's boats need to be transported to the water, therefor lighter. New lighter materials and methods make this possible.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
567
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79
Central Kansas and Central Texas
You're right about the light weight thing, my boats get heavier every year !
I'm kinda hung up on cedar and fiber glass for my use. However I may have found a local supplier fot your exterior luan. That may eliminate the need for fiberglass for inexpensive youth builds..
 
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,850
52
"Cedar and fiberglass" is a proven method for light weight boat building. With today's lack of suitable light weight materials for traditional building methods it would be my choice for an ultimate build.
My experiences with the exterior luan has been positive so far. Don't know about your plans or designs for a youth build are but for no fiberglass building I would recommend staying with the 9mm for the floor.
Please post your source if it works out. That might help someone else.
 
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