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CAMP SAW FOR FIREWOOD

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,553
97
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
For years, I’ve used pruning saws in camp. They are generally a folding saw that cuts on the pull-back. If you think about it, we’re cutting branches, usually in the 2”-4” range. Exactly what is being cut when pruning trees. I’ve been buying inexpensive saws at the local hardware. They’re OK, but I found something that costs about 15%-25% more, but is about 200%-300% better.

A professional pruner won’t use one of the cheapies like I used to buy. They wouldn’t last until lunch time. Similarly, the professional pruner wouldn’t spend the $100-$200 that some camp saws cost. Nor would he work with a bow saw. They require assembly BEFORE using, and DISASSEMBLY and PACKING after being used. There’s about 3 minutes of wasted time.

Googelize this: “Corona Razor Tooth Saw RS7265”. You should be seeing a professionally made saw, with a sturdy red and black handle, and a 10” blade. The teeth on this saw are different than normal saw teeth. The blade is stronger: The teeth are stronger. The teeth are sharper. The teeth will cut faster - while clearing sawdust from the cut - than almost any hand saw you have ever used.

The entire saw - handle, hinge, and blade - exist to support the very tips of the teeth. The tiniest part of the saw is the only reason that the other 99.99% exists. And the tips of these teeth are specially ground.

Do yourself a favor, and get this for yourself for an early Christmas present.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,141
66
76
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
Sounds like a great saw and a lot bigger then the one I use at times.
Group camping , We use downed wood that's dry and easy to break. The harder stuff for a campfire we usually place between two trees or anything upright and close together. Then pull or push on the long one end. The wood ( branch ) always breaks by the one tree.
My one exception for a saw is the ( 3 /14 inch ) one that's in my Victorinox Trekker knife. It's a push pull blade and works great for small twigs up to an inch wide which I can use in a Titanium wood burning backpacking stove. Solo camping the little wood burning stove also doubles as a small campfire for me. Don't need a big fire just for one person.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,553
97
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Over 50 years ago I camped in the Sierras a lot. Probably the most interesting place that I’ve ever seen. I was camping on a 200cc motorcycle, so didn’t carry much gear. Never used a saw. In those days - for some stupid reason - we believed that mountain boots were better if designed to be thick and heavy. Hell, I was young and had pee and vinegar to waste.

My boots were 6” high; the bottom 1 inch was the sole. Long story short, I could bust a pretty good branch by propping it up on a log, and stomping. If a branch was too stout, I laid one end into the fire and lay another alongside so they heated up each other.

Now, my knees just don’t work that well anymore. A small saw is a good friend. And, on that recent canoe trip, the only footwear I had was a pair of light weight plastic Crocks that weighed, say, 6 ounces?

SIDE NOTES:
1, The tips of the teeth on this saw are very addressive. They make short work of even dry, hard oak.
2. This saw can be quickly flipped open. Should circumstances turn bad, it makes a formidable hand-held weapon.