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Gluing rails on

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
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I have put rails on a variety of boats but always with either using fasteners or fasteners and glue. I know that for many gluing jobs there can be a problem with the clamped pieces creeping during clamping or after they are clamped, but before the glue (epoxy) dries.

Given that, I was wondering if I should be prepared for problems with creeping when putting the rails on my pirogue.

Will it be as simple as applying epoxy and clamping? Or will I need to take some extra pains to keep things in place?

I have am 18 ga. brad gun and could shoot in a brad here and there if it is called for just to prevent creeping.

I have what is probably and adequate number of clamps. If I use my c-clamps, short f-clamps and luthier clamps I could do both sides at once and still clamp every 5-6". That is without pressing spring clamps and longer more awkward clamps into service. Given that, maybe it is just a matter of taking care to get the clamps set with the parts in place properly and there really isn't a concern.

Am I worrying about something that isn't going to be a problem given that the bends are pretty gradual and gentle, the cedar rails are pretty compliant, and I have lots of clamps.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
I put epoxy on the boat and then some on the railing and attached it with clamps.
This worked for me..........You'll find a system that's comfotable for you.
The easy way is to attach the raining with a couple of clamps. Release the front or back half of the rail. Epoxy the strip of the boat and the inside part of the rail. Then attach it and repeat the process with the other half of the railing.
I epoxy saturated the sides where the rail would be and let it cure , then the next day I would attach the railing. This way some epoxy was adsorbed into the wood and then the 2nd was epoxy to epoxy. Don't use a lot of epoxy since it will squeeze out when the two parts are clamped together.
You will find out really quick that you don't have enough clamps. I used one every 12 inches and it takes a few clamps when you do both sides at the same time.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,161
12
South Louisiana
Shooting a couple of brads here and there wouldn't hurt a thing. But , if you put all the clamps on and go back and time or two and true everything up, I haven't found that they slip at all while curing.
 

PeteStaehling

Well-Known Member
Aug 23, 2020
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They are nearly impossible to pull without really mutilating the surface in my experience. They are available in stainless steel. I am thinking that I won't need to use them, but will pop one or two in place if I see a need. That said, my expectation is that just clamping will be adequate. It sounds like I was worrying about something that really isn't likely to be a problem. I'll go back and check after every thing is in place and with slow hardener I think I'll have enough time to make adjustments if there is any creeping.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,161
12
South Louisiana
I guess you could dig them out after the glue dries. My first instinct would be to maybe countersink them a bit a putty over them if going with clear varnish. If painted, I don't think that little bit of steel would harm anything. Or maybe just screw them down in a few places and remove the screws and putty the holes.