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Lightweight Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
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#1
OK......After the viewtopic.php?f=6&t=8534 I have done a few things around here..... One is lightning up the load for enjoying the outdoors when going solo.

Disclaimer...... This is for me when going out by myself and only myself......

Since the water is way down and paddling is out of the question ( this was a God's Send in a way , A wake up Call to lighten up. ) a person has to lighten up what they take since they have to tote it on there back and not with the boat hauling everything for them.
With the lack of water it has now become a process of Backpacking , not paddling to enjoy places where others can't get to.

The up side is when we get some water back in the rivers and creeks then we can toss the backpack ( Which we use to tote on our back ) in the boat and take out as a lighter paddler.

Especially ...Without.... all the stuff we use to think was needed when we loaded the boat down and not ourselves. You sure take less when you are the Mule hauling it. :lol:
HINT..If you really wanted to ....It will be OK to toss in a few more things when paddling unless you are planning on toting them. :roll:

I have a light weight ( two pound ) backpack that will hold 4,600 cubic inches of goodies when packed to the max..... Right now that is not a problem since it is not cold weather around here.

1. A Hammock and a sheet.
2. A camping mattress to to put in the hammock , if needed. If not then it adds support to the backpack.
3. The single burner stove ( alcoholic ) and one pot for cooking.
4. Water purifier and water containers , Nalgene 32 oz , a couple of them.
5. A change of clothes plus rain gear.
6. Food ( dehydrated ) and related food items.
7. Toiletries , medication and personal items.
8. Personal items , glasses , a hat , long sleeve shirt , shorts and/or slacks , bug repellent.
9. What I am wearing at the time.
10. A walking staff in place of the paddle.

The stuff that is listed above are what I consider the necessary's , Shelter , Water, Food The main one contributing to the weight is the water and then the food depending on your time out there.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,875
55
80
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#2
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

It's hard to get a pack too light; I've never succeeded in that. You might take a look at that Moment tent I posted about 2 1/2 pounds. I don't know what your hammock weighs; it may be lighter. Which stove are you taking for pot cooking? Another small, alcohol stove - one for water & 2 for cooking?
Have a good time and enjoy yourself. (You might add in a paperback book)
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
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#3
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

The Clark Tropical is exactly 2 pounds with everything. I really prefer the hammock down here due to the heat in the summer. You are up off the ground and have 360 degree ventilation. A tent becomes a sweat box.
The Trianga Westwind stove ( a single burner and holder ) along with a ultralight aluminum saucepan ( Pot ) , one liter size , and the pot holder is less then a pound. It is good for boiling water and heating things up that you want in a pot.

The way I am looking at it is to........ Heat up some soup or something in the pot , enjoy the meal and then to clean the pot heat up some water for tea or coffee thus cleaning the pot. One pot cooking since I am sure there would not be any leftovers in the pot but pretty clean before heating the water up for a drink. :wink: A lot of dried meals all you have to do is add boiling water to them for the meal... viewtopic.php?f=4&t=8548 ...and some you can even eat right out of the bag it cooked in.

Chuck.....
PS. All I needed to get was the westwind stove without the burner since I have a couple of them and the rest of the Trianga gear. The stove is nothing more then a holder for a single burner and a rest for the pot to sit on. Three pieces of aluminum that fit together.
 

oldsparkey

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Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
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#7
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

Kayak Jack said:
It's hard to get a pack too light; I've never succeeded in that.
The trick is in getting what you need for one night camping down to something simple so you can enjoy the evening. Everything from there on is only added or multiplied by the days out camping.... IE: Food , Water and additional creature comfort. Now if you need that additional creature comfort then why not have it for that 1st overnight ......... OK , You had what you needed for the overnight as far as comfort went ...... Why not use the same for a longer time. :D

Nothing changes in the basics from the over night trip to the ones we do for a week or two , except for the food. Whatever you need to make it one night will do for a longer trip , the thing you need to add is the food and water as you extend the trip.

Think about it....... What do you pack all the time for a trip , every trip which is a short overnight one ...... :roll: Now the only thing that changes is the food and water for the duration of that longer trip.

You have to have the basics to enjoy being out there , everything else is frosting on the cake. So How big of a cake do you want to have with you. :lol:

Shelter , Clothing , Food & Beverage.....are the necessities which keep you alive and let you enjoy being out there ...the rest is optional.
 

tx river rat

Well-Known Member
Feb 23, 2007
3,043
2
Waco Tx
#8
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

I can take a tarp knife 1 mre and matches and stay out a night, or include a bow and some fish hooks and line and stay out as long as I want. Now I am not going to be comfortable , I am going to be to hot are to cold, my food will be filling but not tasty.
Well I dont want that anymore , I want good food and water ,sleep warm and dry and comfortable,thats why I yak camp most of the time.

a cold beverage at night.
Camping is one of those deals that is a sadistic sport, the lighter and simpler you get the less comforts you have ,just depends on how much you want to punish yourself :lol: :lol:
Ron
 

oldsparkey

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Aug 25, 2003
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Central , Florida
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#10
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

Ron....

My guess is that the weather has slowed things down on this thread , well anyway for us southern boys. The only comfortable way to camp right now would be with a AC unit in the tent or hammock.
For Florida an air purifier might be nice also , due to all the fires we are having and the smoke in the air. Our rains last week and the 1st part of this week added 6 more fires in the two counties here by me.
If the fires and smoke would not get you the heat and sunlight sure would , clear skies and one furnace up there shinning down on everything.

Only two times during the day when it is almost OK to take a walk , the morning ( real early while it is in the upper 70's ) or late in the evening just before dark.
 
#11
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

Miss Evie and I Like our comforts too. She has done very little camping (but loves it) and I am just getting back into it seriously.

Both of us are too old to rough it anymore and we have no desire to do so. Our tent is mounted on an offroad capable trailer

that loaded with gear for our trips weighs around a tone and a half





We are pretty much self sufficient in this, in that we carry a shower and toilet set up for the bush camping we love, an LPG cooking outfit, There is a 12 volt fridge/freezer

http://www.primusaustralia.com.au/index ... 1288099132

that we run using 120A/hr deepcycle batteries that re-charges using a 120watt folding solar unit. :D

While we use the gas stove a bit, we do most of our cooking on one of these,

http://www.ozpig.com.au/owners







As retirement looms, our camp is continually evolving/improving.

We are also looking at doing some extended river trips and our camp will be very different. To this end I am still researching boat options but so far, one of Mortons Ozark float boats is pretty close on the money.
 
#13
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

G'day Bob,

Lots of piccies here :-
:D
http://www.ozpig.com.au/gallery

Re the stove, They startecd off as converting 9kg LPG bottles but were unable to secure enough old bottles to keep up with demand. Now they produce the bottle as well.

These stoves are so good that Evie and I just can't imagine going camping with out it. It lives in the toolbox on the front of our camper. The legs and flue easily dismantle and sit inside the stove for travelling, At 19 kilograms, it is a lil heavy to back pack :D and about the only place i carry it is from the tool box to the front of the camp.



We set it about 6 feet in front of the main tent annex, leave the front wall off and with the sides on, it manages to warm the whole camp up.
:D





The two warmer plates that come with it make excellent barbeque plates,


and with a piece of 2 inch square arc mesh sitting on the open top over coals, makes a very good toaster,. :D

 
Oct 11, 2011
5
0
#16
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

When I go on a camping trip that involves backpacking and paddling, I vacuum seal a lot of my items. My wife bought a sealer years ago and I use it to seal up my clothes, cell phone and food so none of these items will get wet. This has saved me on a few trips when my backpack fell in water. Is that a wild parrot you have in your photo?
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,875
55
80
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#17
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

Spearmint - welcome aboard. Have you been able to get the cell phone to work while still sealed? I seal up food, but carry clothes in a dry bag I can access & reseal.
Announcement: Canadian red squirrels can smell and locate peanuts in a sealed, vacuum bag. I kid thee not! I wouldn't have believed it, but they do. They drill straight in to the peanuts, pull them out, and leave other stuff behind.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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#18
Re: Backpacking for Paddling later on.........

I am getting there. :D :D :D

Getting ready for an overnight out in the woods down by the Econ with the backpack.

The necessity's are nice and light.
Backpack.......2 pounds. (32oz) ( The Transportation )
Tent 1 lb 14 oz ..( My Home .........Before you ask about a hammock I will explain on down in this post) ( 30 oz) ( Comfort)
Trainga West-wind stove and one pot with a pot lifter 10 oz. ( Cooking and hot meals with coffee or tea )
Sleeping Quilt 1 lb and 6 oz. ( 22oz ) ( Nice warm sleeping )
Sleeping pad , if I use the self inflating 1.8 oz ....( 24 oz) the foam 3/8th inch one 6 oz.

Just the basics not counting food or water and the clothing I am wearing. The whole mess is at 7.375 pounds. or 6.25 pounds if I use the foam sleeping pad.
Anyway I have gotten the basics under 10 pounds so I have a little room to play around with when packing. 8)

Either way it is some light weight camping for a person to have a shelter and security from the weather. I can double or triple that weight with food and water but the weight of the water can be eliminated since I will be camping along a river so boiling the water will be purified for my use , cutting down on the weight that needs to be carried. A nice wood fire ( small one ) will boil water ) :D

Camping with the hammock I could save some weight , especially with the ENO Single nest hammock or Clark Tropical Hammock to replace the tent but there are some areas around here where a hammock can not be erected. Those areas require a tent ( self standing is nice ) and that is the Tarp Tent ( Moment ) which I have decided on. It comes recommended by Kayak Jack and some of his camping buddies. :D

It is definitely a one person shelter that can go up in less then a minute and be free standing while offering a lot of ventilation , while packing nice and small in a backpack. The way I see it ... On trips it will be the hammock and the tent together , together they weigh less then a normal backpacking tent ........

Naturally if I was Paddling in the Canoe then the weight does not matter and extras can be taken but it is nice if the weight can be reduced , e-specially if any toting of the boat over dry ground is involved.

Chuck...........
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,014
3
South Louisiana
#19
Chuck, you HAVE been doing your homework. That weight is down there with the hard core ultralighters. As I age, I find it a welcomed challenge to do more with less. It shows how contented you can be with less than 10 lbs of gear.

If "stuff" made you happy, millonaires should never be sad. It doesn't and they frequently are.

Joey
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
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74
Central , Florida
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#20
jdupre' said:
Chuck, you HAVE been doing your homework. That weight is down there with the hard core ultralighters. As I age, I find it a welcomed challenge to do more with less. It shows how contented you can be with less than 10 lbs of gear.

If "stuff" made you happy, millonaires should never be sad. It doesn't and they frequently are.

Joey
Joey....

I have seen where you took the weight and reduced it to nice and light with your camping gear , a person might call it a work in progress since it is always getting lighter.

I agree , as I aged ...1st weight did not matter , then it started getting heavy , as time passed it got heavier and I started thinking there has to be a better way........ Such as lighter. My idea was to get the major three items ( Pack , shelter , Bedroom and then the kitchen ) as light as possible. If I could get them to weigh the same as the normal backpack then I consider it a success. A normal backpack weighs between 4 pounds and 6 pounds depending on who makes it.
If you take it and don't use it then why take it to start with. As long as the basics and comfort are covered the rest can be considered extra.