Clicky

new years padddle

catfish

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2007
984
0
jesup, ga.
#1
well paddled about a couple of miles today hadn't been in a little while. was good to get out had been wanting to go since our river is up now around 11ft. no one else was on river was overcast actually went to sprinkling a few times.a lot of water in swamps now can go a lot of places. :D this is also when I got my bacon today. paddled to a honey hole (hill) and stalked them :mrgreen:
 

Gamecock

Well-Known Member
Jul 17, 2012
91
0
#2
Hey Catfish, did you get you a hog? How big? There ain't no wild one's here in Iowa yet, although they say there a comin this way. We raise our own and do up 2 or 3 each year. Pork is about my favorite meat. Do the wild ones taste the same as a good old red meat Berkshire? We raise the old time Berks, with some fat on them. I make scrapple too. Man, thats some good eatin. Gamecock.
 

Gamecock

Well-Known Member
Jul 17, 2012
91
0
#4
Hey Jack, and Happy New Year. My wife and I are originally from Delaware and scrapple is very popular there. It was first brought to this country by the Pennslyvania Germans who settled there way before the Revolutionary War and they called it Ponhass. When you kill hogs we would cook down the head in a big pot of water along with all the meat trimmins that didn't go into sausage and the liver or part of the liver and the back fat. This was cooked down until the meat was tender and fell from the bones. This is all strained out and the bones discarded. The meat and liver is then run through a meat grinder. This was my job when I was a kid and it always seemed like I had some mean old bat standing over me while I was cranking that grinder. Anyway, you put that ground up meat back in the pot of broth along with your salt, peppers,( black and red), and some ground onion and bring it back to heat. Now add your cornmeal thats ground pretty fine,( about 4 pounds of meal to 2 or 3 pounds of meat, or what ever consistency you like), and a little bit of buckwheat flour to bind and you simmer that for a half hour or so until your meal is cooked. Mind you keep it stirred the whole time until its done so it doesn't burn. It should be done when the stirring paddle will stand up in the pot of scrapple and not fall over. Now you ladle it out in bread pans and let it cool. The grease will rise to the top of the pan and look like icening . Once it is cooled and set up you can slice it about 1/2 inch thick and fry it or you can trim the grease off and eat it that way sliced. I like it this way on crackers and its already cooked. We fry it with eggs and cheese on sandwichs or fried with taters or pancakes. Its basically breakfast fare. You can make scrapple out of any kind of meat. Pork, beef, deer or a combination, even left over chicken or turkey carcasses. The Germans have another variation of this called Goetta,(ghet-ta), thats the same thing except you replace the cornmeal with groats or steel-cut oats. Its all good. Gamecock.
 

Gamecock

Well-Known Member
Jul 17, 2012
91
0
#7
Hey there Jack, I think its called different things in different places and that may be by the use of ingredients and their amounts. We call it scrapple but in the carolinas, I think they call it liver mush. Gamecock.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,845
52
80
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#8
Methinks you're right. As various fish are known by different names around the country, so too are old family-type recipes. I like to sample different foods and customs in travels - albeit, some a lot more than others. ;-)
 

catfish

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2007
984
0
jesup, ga.
#9
gamecock yea the wild ones are better as with anything in my opinion. but I guess you got to eat why you have or can get right? when I get me a place fixed I'm probably gona fatten one or two a year also for butchering.

yep I was thinking the same thing hog head cheese was what you were describing?