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Opinion on Decks

rhutchinson

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2008
138
0
Middle Tn.
I have a 30+ year old fiberglass canoe. I've spent a lot of hours paddling her and have had a lot of fun memories, but she has a problem that I have never been able to get around. She blows around like a leaf on the water.
Through reading on here I've learned (I think)that boat volume and decks are the two things that have an effect on this. My question is would decks alone on this boat make a differance and if so how much? I'd rather not add a keel because I enjoy her agility, but thought I might make some easily put on/take off decks out of nylon(or some such material).

Thanks
Richard
 

JEM

Well-Known Member
A deck or cover will help. You'll significantly reduce (maybe eliminate) any wind-scoop effect.

When having a permanent deck on a boat designed to have a deck, the overall side height is typically lower than an open hull like a canoe (there are exceptions to that). So you may not get the full "low deck" benefit, but you'll improve what you have.
 

rhutchinson

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2008
138
0
Middle Tn.
Thanks Matt. I'm trying to think of a way to fish thru our windy spring until I get my Laker 14 built. I think that boat will fix my wind issues and this is the spring it's coming to life no matter what :evil: (I hope :lol: )
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,838
141
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
If your deck has a slight arch, it will let the wind slide over it even easier with less wind resistance. Think aerodynamically streamlining - smooth and round, like an egg. No square corners to catch the wind.
 

rhutchinson

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2008
138
0
Middle Tn.
Think aerodynamically streamlining - smooth and round, like an egg. No square corners to catch the wind.

KayakJack, are we still talking about boats or are you making fun of my head :lol: :lol: :lol:

I knew it would have a effect, but didn't know if it would be noticeable with the high freeboard. It"s only a 13 foot boat so that miniumizes it some.

Thanks
Richard
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,838
141
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Well, I was talking about your boat. But, streamlining your head will help too. Shave your head, tuck in your ears, bob your nose, etc.
Is the freeboard high because of extra beam? Possible to trim the gunnels a bit lower?
 

tx river rat

Well-Known Member
Feb 23, 2007
3,043
2
Waco Tx
I have been known to paddle in the wind :lol: :lol: :lol: .
Covering the decks will help, but you have a bigger problem with a canoe and that is the height of the bow and stern. the taller a boat sits out of the water the more wind it catches,
My last three boats have been built with a very low profile fore and after and decks that are the same length and height and really help a lot.
Shape of the deck wont matter much on your boat because you have the square edges of the hull to contend with. so just keep it as low as possible.
I have paddled and owned a lot of canoes , and the low kayak shape and how they handle wind is the reason I dont have any now.
Ron
 

rhutchinson

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2008
138
0
Middle Tn.
Jack it's just high because it's a canoe. I'll not do any permanent changes to it because of sentimental value. It's earned it's keep as is. I'll just have to get a move on building something more suitable for the situation. When I met my currant wife 30 years ago she had a 2yr old and a live in mother. The only way we could get any time to ourselves was to grab the kid and canoe and hit the river, which we did every weekend. Jason would fall asleep instantly on the floor on a pile of boat cushions and wake up when we reached a sandbar for a picknick! He still loves canoeing and does it with his family as often as possible! It was my 'courting canoe' :lol: :lol: Also she don't ride as high now as she did then! I probably weigh almost as much now as the two of us did then. :oops:

TRR I've had the laker 14 plans ever since they came out. I've almost got my work shop built to the point I can start using it. I love the lines of that little boat and can't wait. It will be something new for these waters! I think it will go a long way towards what I'm looking for. I've got 2 or 3 more in the build que after it but I'm looking forward to it the most.

Thanks guys
Richard
 

a Bald Cypress

Well-Known Member
May 7, 2007
577
0
77
Northwest Louisiana
Some polytarp laced to the gunnels over a couple of flexable slats will cut down on the wind induced yaw.

As to the streamlining of the head, you are on your own. :lol:




Looking at the pic, the boat on the left is MUCH harder to keep straight with any wind at all. While the boat on the right, while affected is much easier to control.
 

rhutchinson

Well-Known Member
Jan 18, 2008
138
0
Middle Tn.
Mine is the Scout model of the 'Indian Brand' canoe, but I forget what the manufactures actual name is. It may not have been a very big or long lived company. Mine is shaped more like the one on the right, but it has a very flat bottom. As I remember width at gunnels is about 30" and has a long radius to transition to the flat bottom. I've done everything with it including some white water, but the very things that make it so handy most of the time also work against me in the wind. As has been said on here many times, no boat does everything well.

I was thinking about a couple of cheep tarps to test the effect before I got to much time invested.......until I thought of cardboard and duct tape!!!!! :lol: (keep in mind my signiture line :mrgreen: )

Richard
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,838
141
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
As Baldy points out, some flexible slats under your tarps will help. A slight arch will accomplish two advantages for you. It will shed water (paddle drippings and rain), and reduce eddy currents all fluids (liquids or gasses) will form when going over an obstacle.

A cheap polytarp (as if there were any other kind of polytarp), shears, duct tape, a yardstick or slats, and you can approximate deck coverings. Some canoeists have them in two sections, others in three. If you intend to cover the entire boat with you tucked in, consider three pieces: fore deck, cockpit, and aft deck. If you do enclose yourself into a cockpit, remember that getting out quickly is a helluva lot more important than getting in quickly. You do NOT want entrapment from the deck covering or anything inside the boat. You want a clean, untangled exit.

You might want to browse http://www.cookecustomsewing.com/welcome.htm paying attention to "Canoe Covers" and "Do It Yourself".