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return for 1st and last build

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,227
73
77
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
I didn't have my thinking cap on when I posted the above response. :oops:

Fill the open areas with the epoxy and use wood flour or silica..... Then on the inside run a wood flour and epoxy fillet with the thickest portion over the seam where the light is coming threw..... That will stop it dead in it's tracks.
 
Jul 29, 2009
20
0
69
Rogers Arkansas
Applied thin coat ff epoxy to outside.....bottom and sides.....now weather has changed low 55 high 62..can I procede with light sanding and the cloth or should I wait for temp to rise......please advise
 

woodchips

Well-Known Member
Mar 29, 2010
85
0
52
Montgomery, Alabama
I have done it in colder temps, but i took the epoxy in the house and mixed it after it warmed some. Wife didn't like that. Had to run back inside to mix my next batch. Cold epoxy is thicker to work, and I don’t think the manufacturer recomends it, and it took longer to dry, but I didn't have any issues after it cured.
Would be nice if you could warm the room before you start.
,
You might wait for a second opinion, I do what I do some times when others won't.
Don’t want to steer you too close to the rocks, when waiting would be better.
 

seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,154
4
Denham Springs, LA
manufacturer's recommendations are usually on the label

the stuff we use likes 60 degrees and higher

cooler temps not only take longer to cure but also increases the chance for contamination may reduce final strength - just because it gets hard doesn't mean it's reached its full strength
 
Jul 29, 2009
20
0
69
Rogers Arkansas
ready to apply cloth to outside, bottom and sides.Question apply epoxy from one end headed to the other end.......from the middle to the ends.....the bottom and then the sides.....the bottom and the sides together........rookie needs to know....thanks for the help guys
 

woodchips

Well-Known Member
Mar 29, 2010
85
0
52
Montgomery, Alabama
I start in the middle and work toward the ends and the sides. Then down the sides and let it run off from there. This way the fabric won't want to crawl on ya. And gravity is in your favor.
Its a personal preference to roll or to spatula. I spatula. Don't build up too much, you just want to fill the weave on the first run. Try not to miss your wet cut. That is when it is set enough (almost dry) but still soft enough to run a razor around to remove the excess cloth. Don't panic at the stems, when the cloth gets wet enough it will lay down as you work it. You don' have to cut and fold to make it work.
As I feel we all might do at this point take a deep breath, and say here it goes.
Good luck, you can do it.
 

woodchips

Well-Known Member
Mar 29, 2010
85
0
52
Montgomery, Alabama
The only image I can see is a proud pirogue poppa giving a thumb up.
The only time I had any bubbles I treated them like the plywood man treats a knot.
I created a fiberglass dutchmen.
I cut out the bubble. Then scrapped it clean and downto the wood, so as not to creat a bump when I finished. Then feathered down the edges of my repair location. Cut a patch of glass to fit inside the scrapped area. Inserted the glass patch and topped with epoxy. Placed a piece of flat plastic much larger then the repair on top of the patch, and applied weight. If it on the side you may either turn the boat with repair up, or use large jaw clamps, or jockey sticks ( attached to the walls or a board attached to your horses ) to do this ya have to secure the boad of course.when the patches have dried, sand smooth, and you may want to wipe every thing down with spirits or acatone.
Once your happy with the repairs proceed with your second coat of epoxy. Everything should disappear under it, and I usualy apply at least three coats before I am happy that the weave is covered and protected completely.
Those are my thoughts. You can wait for other, they may have some additional suggestions.
 

woodchips

Well-Known Member
Mar 29, 2010
85
0
52
Montgomery, Alabama
Ok, looked at all the pics.
Let me start with, " IF IT WERE MINE ... "
I'd cut out the large ones and preform the dutchmen proceedure on them.
The small ones I think i would cut out, sand and fill with straight epoxy. but if that location is not level, and I could not make it level to fill, ( to avoid the run )
I would put a band-aid on it after the epoxy. ( and I don't think epoxy even sticks to packing tape any how )
A piece of plastic larger than the repair placed in the center of a piece of packing tape, ( band-aid ), and place it to hold the epoxy from running out untill it has cured.
Next remove band-aid, sand area smooth and wipe the whole boat ...blah,blah, ... roll more epoxy ... blah, blah, you know go on and finish the boat.
Still wait a while and someone else will chime in with how they did it when it happened to them or if it ever happened to them.
Then you can decide what you want to do.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,717
115
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
May well be "out gassing" of air in the wood? If you epoxy when the wood is cold, it out gasses as it heats. You now have a bubble of air. I knife mine, and cut out loose or unsupported glass, and clean out the hole (may have to vacuum it). Cut a small patch, lay epoxy into the hole, lay on the patch, and wet it out. Smooth it as best you can and sand it smooth after it sets.

Next time, epoxy wood in the heat of the day so it suck glue in as it cools.
 

john the pom

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2007
345
1
Queensland
I had an experience with "bubbles" the other week. My fault entirely. I was over vigorous while mixing, stirring a batch of epoxy. When I took it into the sunlight I could clearly see what I had done. Since then I take more care and mix slowly, thus not introducing so much air into the mix. Not saying this is what you did but it can be a factor.
Cheers John.