Clicky

Tying a Self Equalizing Anchor

Deer Slayer

Active Member
Sep 4, 2006
37
0
Need to unpin a boat on the river, or any time an off axis pull is required, a self equalizing anchor system is ideal.

To begin, about 15 feet of static line will be required. The minimum diameter is 10.5mm.

To tie this anchor is fairly simple, as everyone can tie this knot (a overhand, aka, a blood knot)...



and form bights (a bend in the rope)



The first bight is made by bringing the ends of the rope together...



Two additional bights are laid out...



The first overhand knot is tied...



Followed by the second overhand knot...



Carabiners are clipped in....



Then the last carabiner is clipped into the bottom loop

 

Deer Slayer

Active Member
Sep 4, 2006
37
0
George,

I'll be posting additional photos soon on how to use this with z drags, 3 to 1's and the single Mariner hauling system
 

Manjimike

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2007
71
0
Manjimup, West Australia
George,
a self equalising anchor is generally used where the anchor points available, are not sufficient individually to support the load. so each of those 3 carabiners could be attached to small trees for abseilling etc.

Cheers Mike
 

Manjimike

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2007
71
0
Manjimup, West Australia
Hi KJ
abseilling is when you go over the edge of a cliff on a rope using a friction device to control your descent - might also be called rappelling on your side of the pond :lol:

Cheers Mike
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,726
115
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Thanks, Mike. We're two countries separated by the same language, it seems. :wink: A person intentionally going over the edge of a cliff sounds more repelling to me. Kinda like jumping out of a perfectly good airplane.

I watch film clips of folks climbing and descending rock face cliffs, like El Capitan in Yosemite. I also read about what their surviving next of kin think.

I'll stick to taking my chances where it's a bit more necessary, and leave the rock climbing to you other (braver) fellows. So, next time you're out there, and you wonder who that wonderfully skilled fellow is who out climbed you and is already standing up there waiting for you to finish the climb - that won't be me. I'll be the fellow sitting back in camp, flirting with your girlfriend and sipping on your single malt that you left behind. :wink:
 

Manjimike

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2007
71
0
Manjimup, West Australia
I would be waiting at home for the phone call to attend to a rescue - that is where my training came from, mind you I don't mind doing it for recreation, but I use 13mm rescue ropes to do it with :D

Cheers Mike
 

terescova

New Member
Feb 27, 2010
1
0
How do I know what anchor size and drill bit to use? I am planning on hanging some things on my dry wall, but I have all these screws and anchors and I'm not sure what size anchor and drill bit I'm suppose to use? How do I figure this out? How do I know what size screws I have? It doesn't say it on the packaging...
__________________________
keyword research ~ keyword tool ~ keyword tracking ~ affiliate elite
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,726
115
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
When drilling a hole for a wood screw, where you want he threads to bite into he parent material, you want a hole as large as the central, solid shaft of the screw. That will be smaller than the diameter of the threads. If the drill doesn't perfectly match the size of that central shaft, use the smaller, not the larger drill. Two reasons: (1) the threads will bite into the wood anyway, and can compress it somewhat. (2) if it's the wrong size, you can make the hole a bit bigger easier than trying to make one smaller. :wink: