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A Plank Pirogue

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
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The "Plank " part may not be technically correct. More like "solid wood panel". I did not have any suitable planks so I am making/using shorter boards jointed and glued into panels. For sometime I have been buying any "clear/solid" cedar fence boards I ran across. There is some waste and more work and time involved to build this way.
Sized the boards to 1/2"thickness. Straightened the edges and cut them to the same width. I bought a tongue and groove router bit that will work on 3/8" to 5/8" thick boards. Helpful hint, it is easier to mill the groove and tongue joint into the 1/2" boards and then plane down to 3/8" than to mill 3/8" boards.
Boards glued into floor panel.
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Pattern placed for the floor.
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
My photography is worse than my woodworking. The picture angle makes the floor look much wider than it is. Floor is 13' long X 26" wide(8" behind center). Marked the panel and cut it out, then stretched cotton fabric(bed sheet) over the floor. This will be the inside of the bottom.
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
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You doing a full PMF (poor mans fiberglass) on this one?
Maybe? I will make that decision after the boat is built. I want to see how stiff the floor is after covering only the inside, and using the tongue and groove joints. Also may finish the sides "natural" depending how the wood looks after being cut out.

Jack the boat bottom will be max. 26" wide with a side beam width of about 34". Wider than most kayaks but not as wide as most canoes. Probably about average for a full grown pirogue. When I posted the pictures I realized how wide the bottom appeared. Right now the floor is wider than it will finish out. After the chine logs are attached the wood will be planed flushed to the logs. The clamps also add to the illusion.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
Poor man fiber glassing is different than epoxy fiber glassing. First learned(hard way) truth is Titebond 3 dries much quicker than epoxy. That is good and bad.
I removed the cloth and rolled on the glue and then repositioned the cloth. It did not hold. The roller did not apply enough glue, and it had began to dry before all the cloth could be lain down.:mad:
Had to cut out the unglued part and redo.
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beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
Tongue and groove 3/8" boards formed into side panels. Placed the side pattern onto them and traced outline of the sides. This is as far as I have progressed.
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Gamecock

Well-Known Member
Jul 17, 2012
122
1
Poor man fiber glassing is different than epoxy fiber glassing. First learned(hard way) truth is Titebond 3 dries much quicker than epoxy. That is good and bad.
I removed the cloth and rolled on the glue and then repositioned the cloth. It did not hold. The roller did not apply enough glue, and it had began to dry before all the cloth could be lain down.:mad:
Had to cut out the unglued part and redo.
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Hey Mr. Bee, I like your projects, thanks. I have a question on securing the cloth. Can you use oil base paint to adhere the cloth to the wood or do you have to use glue first? Dave.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
Dave, I'm not sure about how well the paint would stick the wood and cloth together. My understanding of the process of canvassing a canoe is that the cloth is attached and held in place by stretching and tacking it. A filler is added to seal the cloth and wood from leaks. It also smooth's the surface for painting.
Old canvas covered canoes I have seen were not built to be water tight until the canvas was added. Paint alone may have sealed and stuck the canvas to the wood but may not have filled out the weave enough for a fair finish.
This boat should be water tight without any finish. The PMF will add some strength, some scuff protection and perhaps a smoother surface. Part of the appeal of trying it is the "poor man" aspect. Epoxy and fiberglass is expensive. Canvas, tacks, filler, etc. are also. Choosing materials and building methods is a balancing act between benefits and cost and necessity.
I will have to finish the boat and use it before I know if it was worth the effort or savings.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,113
79
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
The value of the process, is in the process.
Building your own boat is a journey of many steps - and a few spills.
When building a boat with a kid, we build a lot more of the kid than we do of the boat.