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Anyoner have a set of "study Plans for Redmond's WHISP??

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,437
13
#21
New Friends,

I'd like to build a long/skinny skiff for my NOS Minn-Kota trolling motor to push about for crappie fishing & wonder if anyone has a set of "study plans" for the WHISP (or something similar) that I can look at.

What I'm looking for is to NOT have to try to build something as complicated as the WHISP but something simpler (I fear that my "minimal woodworking skills" are not up to building the lapstrake hull of the Whisp.) that will be as easy to drive with a trolling motor, that will "fish" Darla & I comfortably, set/tend a trotline or set hooks & that I can quickly complete with "tack & tape" construction & that is light enough for the 2 of us to "cartop" on my old MB S-type sedan.

yours, jim
I'm late to the party, so feel free to disregard these ideas. These considerations are only food for thought, not trying to say they are right.
Based on your stated intended use , a "john boat" design could be a good choice.
Troll motor powered = motor won't complain that it is not the most efficient hull. Can be rowed or paddled if necessary.
Very stable for trot lining and other fishing with two people moving around in the boat.
It could be made shorter than the skiff = easier to load (car top) and launch. It may not weigh less but will be handier and seem lighter.

beekeeper
 
#22
I'm late to the party, so feel free to disregard these ideas. These considerations are only food for thought, not trying to say they are right.
Based on your stated intended use , a "john boat" design could be a good choice.
Troll motor powered = motor won't complain that it is not the most efficient hull. Can be rowed or paddled if necessary.
Very stable for trot lining and other fishing with two people moving around in the boat.
It could be made shorter than the skiff = easier to load (car top) and launch. It may not weigh less but will be handier and seem lighter.

beekeeper
beekeeper,

THANKS for your input. - Better late to the party than a no-show, by a great deal.

(Fwiw, I considered a johnboat, too.)

NO final decision on our part, yet.

yours, Darla & jim
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,437
13
#23
Lots of factors to consider before building a boat. Don't think too long, you can always (pr0bably will) build another one.
More ideas to consider; A 3 panel (john) boat will be easier to build.
A 5 panel boat may have more pleasing lines. This can be a reason enough to build one.

beekeeper
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,860
36
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
#24
On my 1st boat building experience the greatest decision was which one to build , when that decision was made the rest came really easy. What made the choice for me was which one I liked the looks of the best. Plus it could be used in any type of water and carry camping gear...
I jumped in , head over heals , with a multi paneled kayak. The COHO from Pygmy boats.
Back in those dark ages there wasn't any web site to help in making a decision or advice about building a wood boat.
It's a long story about this web site being created. Sort version....My Son in law did the computer work while Kayak Jack and I were emailing each other about a different paddling web site. They asked for a article about wood paddling craft but they keep putting us off on a article we did for them. We found out they had no use for any information about wood boats , building or using them. We posted that article on here as one of the 1st things posted.

That was back in 1999 or 2000 and with 4 upgrades and web hosting changes since then it has disappeared.
 
#26
On my 1st boat building experience the greatest decision was which one to build , when that decision was made the rest came really easy. What made the choice for me was which one I liked the looks of the best. Plus it could be used in any type of water and carry camping gear...
I jumped in , head over heals , with a multi paneled kayak. The COHO from Pygmy boats.
Back in those dark ages there wasn't any web site to help in making a decision or advice about building a wood boat.
It's a long story about this web site being created. Sort version....My Son in law did the computer work while Kayak Jack and I were emailing each other about a different paddling web site. They asked for a article about wood paddling craft but they keep putting us off on a article we did for them. We found out they had no use for any information about wood boats , building or using them. We posted that article on here as one of the 1st things posted.

That was back in 1999 or 2000 and with 4 upgrades and web hosting changes since then it has disappeared.

oldsparkey,

I'm considering FIRST building a REALLY simple skiff/johnboat for Darla & I to fish out of in the creeks/quiet lakes around here using a 12V trolling motor BUT my plan is to build a large power skiff for my treasured/low-hours 1957 Johnson JAVELIN soon. = Maybe Dynamite Payson's SEA HAWK.

yours, jim
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,860
36
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
#27
WOW , You are not going for just a piece of the cake but the whole cake and bakery in one bite.
Take your time , study the plans and know them. Then know at lease three steeps ahead in the building process from where you are. It's a good way to understand what you are doing and will be doing when building the boat.
Most folks get in a rush when it starts to look like a boat , at that part take a deep breath , sit back and relax then continue but not in a hurry.

Chuck.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,437
13
#28
[QUOTE="oldsparkey, post: ...............
Back in those dark ages there wasn't any web site to help in making a decision or advice about building a wood boat.
It's a long story about this web site being created. Sort version....My Son in law did the computer work while Kayak Jack and I were emailing each other about a different paddling web site. They asked for a article about wood paddling craft but they keep putting us off on a article we did for them. We found out they had no use for any information about wood boats , building or using them. We posted that article on here as one of the 1st things posted.
That was back in 1999 or 2000 and with 4 upgrades and web hosting changes since then it has disappeared.[/QUOTE]


Chuck could you or Jack repost the article? I wasn't here at the beginning so I think it would be interesting to read it.

bee
 
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Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,012
68
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#29
I no longer have the article, sorry. It was lost in a computer crash. (It's truly fortunate that other fellow authors, such as Shakespeare, Twain, and Hemingway didn't yet have computers).

I had gotten acquainted with the two, young chaps who were building their business net site. Actually. Pleasant guys. But, soon, they had hired a vitriolic pair who scented competition. They just nit picked our article to death. Then, would reverse and want more on an area they had already criticized. The final straw was over the question of what materials were used to build kayaks and canoes. They stated, unequivocally, that wood was not a suitable material.

Up until that time, I hadn't realized that all of Columbus' ships - and the Mayflower - were made of fiberglass.
 
Dec 9, 2017
22
0
The Alamo City
#30
WOW , You are not going for just a piece of the cake but the whole cake and bakery in one bite.
Take your time , study the plans and know them. Then know at lease three steeps ahead in the building process from where you are. It's a good way to understand what you are doing and will be doing when building the boat.
Most folks get in a rush when it starts to look like a boat , at that part take a deep breath , sit back and relax then continue but not in a hurry.

Chuck.
Chuck,

Speaking of the bakery, our eventual plan is a retirement houseboat (with a barge hull) that I've been designing for over 3 years. (Actually, I started on the design in 1999, long before I even met Darla.) = The HB will be 62 feet long X 28 feet beam & 2 stories tall. = My house design is similar to a townhouse for a narrow lot. = Over 1700SF is a considerable amount of usable living area.
(FIRST, I have to get Darla to finally retire & that may be a bigger problem than constructing the HB!!!)

yours, jim
 
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Dec 9, 2017
22
0
The Alamo City
#32
Kayak Jack.

The "lake system" called THE GULF OF MEXICO & the MV DARLA'S DAYDREAMS will be "home-ported in" Aransas Pass, TX. = She will be powered by a diesel IB, with conventional shaft/prop drive.
(I don't figure that a mortal man can live long enough to explore all the interesting places along the TX near-shore/coastal areas, at a hull-speed of 7-11KPH.)

She will carry 300 gallons of diesel & 500 gallons of fresh water.
(The gray-water & black-water systems will use seawater. - Only the graywater system will be discharged overboard.)
The entire surface of the roof will be covered with solar panels, to charge a bank of deep-cycle batteries.

I expect the MV to just "ghost along" making little noise or fuss behind her.

yours, Darla & jim
 
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Dec 9, 2017
22
0
The Alamo City
#34
Kayak Jack,

A fairly well-known abbreviation among power-boat folk: The USCG designation for (a NON-governmental) MOTOR VESSEL.
(Usually confined to watercraft that are DOCUMENTED with the USCG or another international marine police agency.)

Btw, Darla laughingly calls it: The World's Biggest Jonboat.
(Actually a garvey sort of hull)

yours, Jim
 
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oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,860
36
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
#36
One of the guys I worked with at the Sheriffs office got busy and built himself a house boat. It was a beauty , nice interior , a deck around it with a nice sitting area on the bow and stern. Even had a little office centered on the top of it. The rest of the top was more or less a sundeck. He managed to use every square inch of his house boat.
He had it mored at the local marina and would spend his time on it both off duty and time off. He is a southern boy who likes his grits and like most of us would cook to much most of the time , or so he liked to tell us. The reason I say that is because he would take the excess and toss it off the back deck.
By doing that he created a large school of sunfish or catfish off the back deck looking for a free meal which worked to his advantage.
He would wet a hook and catch a couple , clean them and into the frying pan for a fresh fish supper. When he retired he beat the tax man by moving it to a pier off some property he owned on the river. By having his home floating and not motorized there was no registration or tax to pay on it. The property was taxed low because it was not improved or lived on.
When he wanted to move the house boat he would tow it with a small skiff he used to run the river with.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
237
5
76
Central Kansas and Central Texas
#38
Kayak Jack,

A fairly well-known abbreviation among power-boat folk: The USCG designation for (a NON-governmental) MOTOR VESSEL.
(Usually confined to watercraft that are DOCUMENTED with the USCG or another international marine police agency.)

Btw, Darla laughingly calls it: The World's Biggest Jonboat.
(Actually a garvey sort of hull)

yours, Jim[/QUOTE
 
Dec 9, 2017
22
0
The Alamo City
#40
oldsparky,

Here in TX, houseboats in saltwater MUST be powered & may NOT be powered by an OB motor or trolling motor, regardless of size.
(Besides which, I like diesel engines because I fear FIRE when out on the salt.)

yours, jim