Clicky

Old Tools

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41


What are these? They belonged to my grand father. He was a carpenter.
I know what the bottom left one is, and actually used it once. Never needed it since, and that was 32 years ago (I was 2). The top left one appears to fit a hand brace. I have no clue about the one on the right. It could be a nail or screw extractor.

beekeeper
 

seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,161
7
Denham Springs, LA
Here's a top shot of the forge showing the drum in a drum



here's a bottom shot showing the smaller drum covering the bolt holes and 2" pipe coming from axle hole



here's the "plumbing" shot, combustion air into the bull of the tee and ashes falling down the run



and here's something you don't see very many of, it's a sawyer's anvil, made by Fisher in the early 1900's

 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
beekeeper said:


What are these? They belonged to my grand father. He was a carpenter.
I know what the bottom left one is, and actually used it once. Never needed it since, and that was 32 years ago (I was 2). The top left one appears to fit a hand brace. I have no clue about the one on the right. It could be a nail or screw extractor.

beekeeper
The bottom tool is a steel pipe with a brass rod inside(plunger). The rod is withdrawn and the pipe is placed over a nail. The rod is struck by a hammer to drive the nail. It is used for nails in hard to reach places.
No one knows what the other two are for? With all the knowledge (Boat Science :wink: ) posted I figured somebody would know.

beekeeper
 

gbinga

Well-Known Member
Nov 7, 2008
736
2
Hoschton, GA
Beekeeper,

You can still get tools like that nail driver. I have a couple different sizes. Handy when you have just a few finish nails to drive and it isn't worth the time to set up the compressor.

Can you try to get some closer pics of the other two? You have me curious, but I am stumped so far.

George
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
beekeeper said:
beekeeper said:


What are these? They belonged to my grand father. He was a carpenter.
I know what the bottom left one is, and actually used it once. Never needed it since, and that was 32 years ago (I was 2). The top left one appears to fit a hand brace. I have no clue about the one on the right. It could be a nail or screw extractor.

beekeeper
The bottom tool is a steel pipe with a brass rod inside(plunger). The rod is withdrawn and the pipe is placed over a nail. The rod is struck by a hammer to drive the nail. It is used for nails in hard to reach places.
No one knows what the other two are for? With all the knowledge (Boat Science :wink: ) posted I figured somebody would know.

beekeeper
The top tool may be an extension for bits used in a hand brace. The end opposite the brace has a square opening to accept the drill bit ( or something(. Inside is a threaded part the moves to tighten the (bit?).

The tool on the right may be for plumbing. It is stamped "Superior Chicago". Thought it was puller of some kind. A rod or pipe will pas through it and locked by the cam leaver, but it doesn't hold for pulling direction. I will post any new leads.

beekeeper
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
bearridge said:
beekeeper said:
It is stamped "Superior Chicago".
Dang....if that aint the oxymoron of all time, I dont know what iz. [chuckle]
My mistake it is stamped . "Superior"
"Chicago"
It struck me as funny also.

beekeeper
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
Update and correction. The guess about a bit extension is correct. Located my grandfather's set of Craftsman bits (made in the U.S.A.), and they fit and tighten perfectly.

The other tool DOES lock in the pulling direction. I just don't know what it pulls. Any help out there?

beekeeper
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
Jimmy W said:
Bootlegger0173 said:
...what is that inverted horseshoe looking thing over your breaker box?

Nice springboard, BTW.
That is for lifting bales of hay up into your hayloft.
My Daddy told me that was my job. Sure wished he would have had one of those tools insted. :)

beekeeper
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
Jimmy W said:
beekeeper said:
Jimmy W said:
That is for lifting bales of hay up into your hayloft.
My Daddy told me that was my job. Sure wished he would have had one of those tools instead. :)

beekeeper
Actually it just holds onto the bale for you. You still have to pull it up with a rope.
Obviously, hence the :) . One of those fancy rope loaders would have been nice. I was told all you had to do was pull on the rope and the bales went into the loft. :wink: :lol: Sure would beat throwing them over your head.

beekeeper
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,694
41
Jimmy W said:
I didn't like any part of baling hay. Sure was glad when my father sold that hay baler.
Always preferred fishing to bailing. Actually the bailing was the easy part. What happened after the bails hit the ground was the fun part. When using the tool, were the bails being lifted tied with strings or wire? A set of block and tackle or a single pulley for the rope?

beekeeper
 

Jimmy W

Well-Known Member
May 1, 2006
611
1
north georgia, USA
We didn't have the tool went we had the baler. The tool was picked up later. The baler that we had used wire and was powered by a 2 cylinder Wisconsin motor. Making the bales was the easy part, but even that wasn't much fun especially when the wind was blowing the hay scraps on you. Cutting the hay was more fun because you could shoot at the rabbits that ran out.
 

seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,161
7
Denham Springs, LA
Here's an old tool that I just had given to me

It's a manual or blacksmith's drill press, made in the 1890's

you turned the handle to rotate the drill bit and the pawl moved across a toothed wheel (at the top) to rotate a screw which moved the bit downward

 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,189
27
South Louisiana
Neat. 8) I've heard it referred to as a post drill. That's where it was usually mounted. Blacksmith's got no break whatsoever- beating on iron with a heavy hammer then cranking that contraption to drill through solid steel. Bet they could do you in with a vicious uppercut.