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Old Tools

Discussion in 'Gallery' started by Jimmy W, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. Jimmy W

    Jimmy W Well-Known Member

    George mentioned starting a thread on tools. Since he hasn't gotten to it, I thought that I would start it off.

    Some drills, augers, wrenches, draw knife and ice saw and tongs.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Drill press
    [​IMG]

    Some saws
    [​IMG]
    With hay bale lifter
    [​IMG]

    Cotton scale
    [​IMG]

    Forge blowers and small forge
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Cant hook
    [​IMG]

    Some hammers and hatchets and horse shoeing tools.
    [​IMG]

    Working with all these tools can make you thirsty, so you need a refreshment barrel.
    [​IMG]

    Most of these came from my father who lurks on here pretty often.

    Jimmy
     
  2. Wannabe

    Wannabe Well-Known Member

    Jimmy,
    Nice breast drill. With all the tongs I knew there was a forge somewhere. That's something having the weights still on a cotton scale. Thanks
    Bob
     
  3. Jimmy W

    Jimmy W Well-Known Member

    That isn't the correct weight for the cotton scale. It is too heavy and needs to be ground down.

    I'm thinking that my father does still have another one with the pea as I think the weight was called.
     
  4. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

    I have an idea that should the folks on here get together, there might actually be enough stuff betwinxt all of us to properly provide for our own historical museum set, complete with live demos on the how-to's o' things.
     
  5. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Just the gathering of us itself would constitute a museum, Steve. No other tools needed. Subject would likely be modified from "Old Tools" to read "Old Fools."
     
  6. oldsparkey

    oldsparkey Well-Known Member

    I hate to say it but those are not , I repeat ...NOT old tools , I have a lot of the same ones here that are used off and on by myself. Especially the drills and saws. I'm sure they are not that old , they were Dad's and then I got them to use and they are better then a lot of the new junk a person purchases today. :D :D :D

    Chuck.
    PS. Haven't found anyone to work that other end of the cross cut saw. :roll:
     
  7. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

    I gotta admit you're right about that Jack. . . you DO belong in a museum labeled "Old Fool." :lol: :lol: :lol:

    The rest of us can jus' donate things to the exhibit. . . with a show 'n' tell featurin' Kayak Jack Waking to The Sound of Islandpiper's Music :lol: :lol:

    Sorry Jack. . . just couldn't resist. . . 8)
     
  8. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Fire away, Steve. I laughed at it too.
     
  9. seedtick

    seedtick Well-Known Member

    friend Keith and I ocassionally hit the road with this display on logging and dugout tools

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  10. jdupre'

    jdupre' Well-Known Member

    I love the old tools too. I only have a few. Draw knives, spokeshave, brass-spined back saw and my favorite-- my dad's crosscut saw (circa 1930) minus one handle and clamp. One handle cus he used it BY HIMSELF. He used to cut firewood for a local bakery for $1.50 a face cord. Paddled down the bayou, cut a tree down from the bateau into the swamp, bucked it into managable pieces and loaded it up to be split back at home. He said he could do about a cord and a half a day. $2.25 a day was BIG money in the 1930's. Most guys were lucky to get more than a dollar a day at that time.
     
  11. Mutinousdoug

    Mutinousdoug Active Member

    A touch of erl wouldn't hurt those blades none would it? Or would that affect the collector value some?
     
  12. seedtick

    seedtick Well-Known Member

    Here's a set of log tongs that you don't see every day

    [​IMG]
     
  13. seedtick

    seedtick Well-Known Member

    how 'bout old fool, new tool

    [​IMG]
     
  14. oldsparkey

    oldsparkey Well-Known Member

    You guys need a bigger chain saw , not something like the one in the picture that was made for trimming limbs. What is the length of the blade , 4 1/2 feet ......might be 5.2 .......Hard to tell from the picture.

    Naturally I am asking about the Stihl one on the table. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :roll:

    Chuck.
     
  15. Bilgerat

    Bilgerat Well-Known Member

    The only thing to say here is "DAYYUM!!!!". Dat's a saw! :shock: :shock: :shock:

    Mike
     
  16. seedtick

    seedtick Well-Known Member

    chainsaws are like clamps, you can never have enough and sometimes you need one a little bigger

    somedays even a four footer is too small

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

    I bet da kick back or da chain whippin' loose off dat saw would be a mudder. . . Where dat man's chaps. . . I t'ought we 'ad rewls regardin' da safety o' folks? :roll:

    No. . . really, though. . . I would hate to be in the line of fire if that chain clipped. . . ouch wouldn't cover that, I bet. . . :shock: :oops:

    Dat be a saw I'd like t' have, though. . . :D
     
  18. seedtick

    seedtick Well-Known Member

    Here's a shot of friend Keith's new 130 year old Peter Wright farrier's anvil

    he's still looking for a big one

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Bilgerat

    Bilgerat Well-Known Member

    I see a forge to the right of that anvil. How 'bout a shot of that, too?

    And thanks for all the pics you show us! 8) 8) 8)

    Mike
     
  20. seedtick

    seedtick Well-Known Member

    this is the best shot of the forge that i have right now, i can get you a better one later if you want

    [​IMG]

    basically it's a brake drum from a gravel truck - 18 wheeler - that we had cut down to about 6", then dropped in another smaller (pickup truck i think) brake drum to cover the lug bolt holes and reduce the axle hole down to where a 2" pipe would fit it. Weld a few 1/2" rods across the hole and you've got the tuyre (sp?). Come out the bottom with a short 2" nipple and hook on a 2" tee vertically and hook up a old manual Buffalo blower to the bull of the tee and add a short section of pipe with a screw on pipe cap to the bottom run- that collects the ashes and keeps everything tight so the blower air goes up thru the forge. Then wrap the whole setup in an angle iron stand. BTW the large brake drum is 1/2" thick so the forge will last a long time before it burns out.

    my forge is the same except i use a small electric blower for combustion air
     

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