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Question about stoves

tx river rat

Well-Known Member
Feb 23, 2007
3,043
2
Waco Tx
First this is a legit queston
What advantage does the wood burning stoves have over a few rocks and my grill fired with wood?
Ron
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,161
12
South Louisiana
1. Better fuel efficiency. Might make a difference in some locales. I normally can find armloads of cooking fire wood
within 100' of any campsite around here.

2. Less weight. For a backpacker, an extra pound or two is a deal breaker. Kayak and canoe campers are more tolerant of extra weight.

3. Less bulk. But not much. Grills tend to be bigger, but they do fit well in flat open areas inside a boat, so they are hardly noticed.

My feeling is that light weight and small size are the major draws. And you have to enter the "tinker" factor in there too, for the dyed-in-the-wool tinkerers.

I'm with you, though. I do think the basic grill is a great all around cooking system.The more I use my grill, the less I reach for the alcohol stove. When camping, I always have a fire going or coals available to start a cooking fire on short notice. I just enjoy a fire in the outdoors.

Joey
 

Jimmy W

Well-Known Member
May 1, 2006
611
1
north georgia, USA
In some parts of the country rocks are hard to come by. Could probably get by with less wood and would shield flames from wind. I don't own a wood stove, I tend to use a grill and fire like you. I have started carrying a small alcohol stove for quickly heating water or soup, etc.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,713
113
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Some areas have fire restrictions from time to time, and ban open fires. A small twig stove, sitting in a metal pie pan, can be OK for use in some of those areas. I like both systems, just each has its own characteristics.
 

tx river rat

Well-Known Member
Feb 23, 2007
3,043
2
Waco Tx
I am sure not knocking them,but since I cut my grill smaller, that helps,here we have rocks are sand are even mud can be used as a fire shield. I just wondered if I was missing something.
Ron
 

wilded

Well-Known Member
Aug 28, 2003
124
0
Round Rock, Texas
I noticed the little Coleman dual fuel stoves and dual fuel lanterns are getting harder to find. I found a new dual fuel Coleman stove at Wally world and bought it, they only had two. If you want to have one for a when TSHTF you might one to buy one soon and put back. I can remember some trips where a cup of coffee, soup or tea made on my little stove helped save the day. JMHO
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,713
113
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
I ditched my Coleman Dual fuel stoves over a year ago. I'd used the old, Coleman single burner as a rock-steady reliable standby for 25 years. Then, I foolishly upgraded to a Dual Fuel. Though reliable at first, it never lived up to their claims. The check valve in the pump failed twice. The stove spit out gasoline from the air hole in the pump handle. When the stove is already lit - THAT gets your attention! I lost track of how many generators I had to replace, and many of them leaked.

I chose a Svea 123 and like it fine.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,223
72
77
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
tx river rat said:
First this is a legit queston
What advantage does the wood burning stoves have over a few rocks and my grill fired with wood?
Ron
1... Six of one and a half of a dozen of the other.
2... Down here the only advantage is like Jack said , When a burning ban is in effect then you have to use a stove and on a wood chickee a stove is mandatory for obvious reasons.
3...Normal camping , either works really well and we use both ( when possible ) out camping. A grill is used most of the time for group cooking since we always have a fire going.
4...The little alcohol stove lets you heat up an individual bowl of soup in a tent when you can't be outside.
5... As the old saying put's it , Location , Location , Location and I like to add .... The Weather.

Chuck.
I gave up on the single burner , duel fuel ( Coleman) stoves , the quality of them has gone down hill. Still have two of the old ( reliable white gas ) double burners.
 

wilded

Well-Known Member
Aug 28, 2003
124
0
Round Rock, Texas
Kayak Jack said:
I ditched my Coleman Dual fuel stoves over a year ago. I'd used the old, Coleman single burner as a rock-steady reliable standby for 25 years. Then, I foolishly upgraded to a Dual Fuel. Though reliable at first, it never lived up to their claims. The check valve in the pump failed twice. The stove spit out gasoline from the air hole in the pump handle. When the stove is already lit - THAT gets your attention! I lost track of how many generators I had to replace, and many of them leaked.

I chose a Svea 123 and like it fine.
Sounds like I need to find one of the old single burner, white gas models. I have a little brass stove that has been great for years. I have carried it since I was in my younger 20s and now I am 56 and it has started leaking. I have not been able to fix it or find a like stove. ;(
 

tx river rat

Well-Known Member
Feb 23, 2007
3,043
2
Waco Tx
Thanks for the replies
For me the best set up has been the Propane single burner for coffee (Right Chuck) inside a tent and grill outside.
I have several of the single burner colemans ,white gas and the thing I disliked about them and the reason I went to propane was the smell of the gas fumes when the stove was shut down after use.
Like you said Location sensitive :D
Ron
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,223
72
77
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
tx river rat said:
Thanks for the replies
For me the best set up has been the Propane single burner for coffee (Right Chuck) inside a tent and grill outside.

Ron
That one morning I really don't think you would of located any dry wood anywhere on the central or eastern side of Texas , much less set the grill up in the flooded tent. :lol:
That little propane stove was a life saver and a darn good heater. Dare I say , Location and Weather were the contributing factors.

Chuck.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,713
113
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Lemme introduce something here? We are mentioning "location" and "weather". I sure agree with that. Tossing in personal preferences (regardless of external factors), and, say, time, maybe a more inclusive term for us could be "situational"? This word can take into account all the variables you want to add in.

What we think of what we do, and how we choose to do it, is situationally sensitive.
 

islandpiper

Well-Known Member
Joey, I've thought about bringing some rocks to put your grill on. We'll carry them in your boat.

Yes, I like your grill too. Useful for lots of stuff, including keeping the Thermette hot.

I'd rather not have to cook on an alcohol stove but they are good insurance to carry and an easy way to make one cup of coffee fast. In fact, after a half a century of cooking on some sort of stove, i've decided i like the fire better.....may have had something to do with getting my dutch ovens

piper
 

catfish

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2007
996
3
jesup, ga.
ron i have the old two burner coleman stove it burns the white gas . i believe it may be the duel fuel? it is about 35 years old. :D i still use it john boat camping & ocasionally canoeing. i recently bought the single coleman stove. the bigger one is heavier made out of good stuff. i bought the little one mainly for canoeing lot less weight & room.

i guess one day i will up grade like you geezers to the wood burning. k jack i have only replaced generator in my old one one time. you must been pumping mud thru yours. :wink: :lol: :lol: :lol: by the way i have the coleman white fuel lantern i got at the same time for christmas .
 

islandpiper

Well-Known Member
sure, tucked away over the coals, and holding my copper thermette is the wire rack, wood stove?, of Jdupre'.



Weighs nothing, holds everything. Neat tool. He missed packing it last June and we missed it in camp.

Joey has lots of pictures of the grill/rack with big steaks cooking on it, but i've never actually SEEN that, since he doesn't bring steaks when we camp together......just a foot or so of anduille. :D :D :D

piper
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,161
12
South Louisiana
Piper, I would never bring andouille. That's the GOOD stuff. Good old Savoie smoked sausage is my staple meat. I bring a steak if I really HAVE to------ you know. when I can't find the sausage. I would not subject any of my campmates to a grisely, chewy, charred steak when there's Savoie's to be had. :mrgreen:
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,713
113
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Rocks that are soaked with water will explode when heated. steam pressure from inside. The same rock, left to dray a few days, is perfectly safe. In parts of Canada, where I paddle some, is gneiss. Properly handled, it will break into nice triangles an inch or two thick, and 10" - 15" on a side. These stack nicely into a little fireplace.

I like a trench fire where it's easy to control wind coming into it, and pots rest on its edges.