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Question about stoves

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,233
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77
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
tx river rat said:
First this is a legit queston
What advantage does the wood burning stoves have over a few rocks and my grill fired with wood?
Ron

Ron asked this ( The highlighted part I made on his post ) at the start of his post in the General section..... Things got a little out of hand on there so I cleaned it up and moved it here as a reference for anyone else asking or not asking but wanting to know the same thing and wanting an civil answer so they can make a decision. :D

Chuck.........
 

islandpiper

Well-Known Member
Wilded, several of us have them. Chuck likes his. I have made a bunch of ashes in mine with the following result: yup, it folds up flat....burns anything you can put into it......and it is clever. But, with a pepsi can spirit burner and a large can I can boil water faster than with this twig stove. I'll probably keep carrying it into the swamp just because it LOOKS LIKE IT OUGHT TO WORK.

piper
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,728
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Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
A problem with many twig stoves is their basic layout. Many are designed to lay flatter than they are tall when assembled. By that, I mean they are wider than they are tall. Heat goes up, not sideways. Stoves built to accommodate that basic fact burn better. A tall stove will allow the fire to draw.

A fire that draws properly feeds itself, and needs no auxiliary fans or bellows for air supply. It builds heat more rapidly and burns more cleanly, thereby producing more heat per pound of fuel. Ability to properly hold a large kettle with water or food is another criteria. Stability on the ground so it doesn't tip over is another.

Once these operational concerns are addressed, THEN a designer can look at weight, simplicity, cost, etc. But, operational considerations should come first.
 

hairymick

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2005
2,107
2
Queensland, Australia
This little feller is a stroke of genius



and so is this one,



Many of our national parks prohibit all open fires all of the time.

either Trangia or Zip stoves are a viable option.
 

Manjimike

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2007
71
0
Manjimup, West Australia
wilded said:
At 1.2 lbs may be ok for kayak but not my choice for hiking.
I made a similar stove to the Nimblewillnomad but used titanium sheet and it weighs less than 4 ozs
and hopefully seen here -
http://my.opera.com/Manjimike/albums/sh ... re=5704919

I also use propane after getting rid of my Coleman dual fuel - I could never get it to simmer, now my Kovea Ti (click on Previous in the above link) will last me 11days on a 220 gm cylinder

Cheers Mike
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,728
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Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
ManjiMike, I've always liked the basic design of a NimbleWill stove, but thought it needed to be taller, and maybe a bit shorter? Height will give a chimney effect for updraft (draught for you?), and thus a hotter fire. What are your thoughts on that?
 

Manjimike

Well-Known Member
Jun 18, 2007
71
0
Manjimup, West Australia
G'day Jack,
What you say makes sense, but as I only boil water, which might take 5 mins instead of 3-4 mins on the propane it doesn't worry me. I have put plenty of holes in for the fire to draw.
It is normally only my backup stove, but as you can see from the photos I can invert it and use hexamine tablets or leave the floor out and use it as a back-up windsheild for the propane stove

Cheers Mike