Clicky

Scrap Brazillian Mesquite

Neil74

Member
Mar 9, 2019
11
0
63
Hi, was once a member computer crashed and I have finally found this site again. I am a retired machinist with a bad back, I used to fish from a canoe but I am looking for a platform a bit more stable. Mostly inshore fishing along the Gulf Coast and trips in the many Cypress swamps here in Pasco County, Fl. Has anyone used scrap hardwood flooring-Brazilian Mesquite 5/16 x 3 inch Bella Wood Flooring. Random lengths from 1 to 6 foot long?
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
Looking for "a stable platform" will require a bit more information.
What kind of canoe did you find not stable enough? Length, beam, floor width, and seat height, etc.?
Looking at your post I will guess your seating height will determine the design best suited for your use. What is the lowest you can sit comfortably?
 

Neil74

Member
Mar 9, 2019
11
0
63
Looking for "a stable platform" will require a bit more information.
What kind of canoe did you find not stable enough? Length, beam, floor width, and seat height, etc.?
Looking at your post I will guess your seating height will determine the design best suited for your use. What is the lowest you can sit comfortably?
I used to own a 17 foot Grumman sailing canoe and enjoyed it very much. I have had 5 back surgeries with 9 fused vertebrae, unfortunately they want to go back in and fuse 2 more lower and 2-3 more upper. Not about to happen, at 63 I have had enough. I can no longer sit without some sort of back support and can not do well with a boat that rocks sideways easily. Pirouges look to be stable enough to stand and flat enough to be stable while moving about.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,909
38
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
. Pirouges look to be stable enough to stand and flat enough to be stable while moving about.
I would rate the stability of a pirogue somewhere between a canoe and a kayak. I paddled/poled the Okefenokee in my canoe for quite a distance while standing , haven't had the nerve to try it in my Pirogue in open water. I did stand in the pirogue on one Okefenokee trip but it was straddling a mud bank just under the surface which offered support. . Some folks on here stand in their pirogues while fishing or looking around.
I was told that a extra center rib helps to widen the middle and add a lot of stability to it for standing. Thats with 4 ribs equal distance apart in the pirogue instead of only 3 ribs. .
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
. I can no longer sit without some sort of back support and can not do well with a boat that rocks sideways easily.
The soft chine pirogue I built was more squirrelly than the hard chine boats. It was as stable overall but not as comfortable because your body was having to adjust to the rocking motion. It paddled well but was not a solid feel when casting or other activity. The canoe was probably acting in a similar fashion and causing your discomfort.
Only you can determine what will work best for you, because only you can know your abilities and comfort. If you were shopping for a manufactured boat I would suggest you test paddle different models before buying. Not as easy to do with handmade boats. If standing is a priority or a necessity, a stand up paddle board may be for you.
Based on your information and my limited experiences A marsh pirogue design would be my starting place. It has developed and evolved to be a stable platform, often powered by standing using a push pole. A 10" to 14" high seat with a sturdy contoured back would probably help.
 

Neil74

Member
Mar 9, 2019
11
0
63
The soft chine pirogue I built was more squirrelly than the hard chine boats. It was as stable overall but not as comfortable because your body was having to adjust to the rocking motion. It paddled well but was not a solid feel when casting or other activity. The canoe was probably acting in a similar fashion and causing your discomfort.
Only you can determine what will work best for you, because only you can know your abilities and comfort. If you were shopping for a manufactured boat I would suggest you test paddle different models before buying. Not as easy to do with handmade boats. If standing is a priority or a necessity, a stand up paddle board may be for you.
Based on your information and my limited experiences A marsh pirogue design would be my starting place. It has developed and evolved to be a stable platform, often powered by standing using a push pole. A 10" to 14" high seat with a sturdy contoured back would probably help.
Thanks I will look into that design, I need to move around when I start cramping and trying to correct an unstable boat does not help my lower back.
 

Neil74

Member
Mar 9, 2019
11
0
63
I would rate the stability of a pirogue somewhere between a canoe and a kayak. I paddled/poled the Okefenokee in my canoe for quite a distance while standing , haven't had the nerve to try it in my Pirogue in open water. I did stand in the pirogue on one Okefenokee trip but it was straddling a mud bank just under the surface which offered support. . Some folks on here stand in their pirogues while fishing or looking around.
I was told that a extra center rib helps to widen the middle and add a lot of stability to it for standing. Thats with 4 ribs equal distance apart in the pirogue instead of only 3 ribs. .
I had the impression a Pirogue was more stable than a canoe, less may not be what I am looking for.I tried a couple kayaks but sitting flat with my legs stretched out caused discomfort on my back and legs.I miss fishing but can't find any on shore fishing spots here around Hudson. Just have to keep looking, oh well it is what it is. Thanks
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,113
79
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Neil, a flat bottomed boat will demonstrate more initial stability than a vee or semi-rounded bottom. It feels more stable and resists leaning. BUT, when the lean reaches its limit, the boat suddenly breaks and flips.

A semi-rounded bottom shows less initial stability, but more secondary stability, especially if the sides are flared. Another characteristic of a semi-rounded bottom is how they ride while in waves.

As waves flow along under a boat, they effect the boat. A flat bottomed boat will, by necessity, roll as the flat bottom matches the angles of the passing wave. The flat bottom rolls to match the approaching angle of the leading edge, roll back to level as the crest passes under, and continue to roll to the opposite side as the trailing edge of the wave pases along. With a semi-rounded bottom boat will simply bob up and tnen back down as the a wave rolls along underneath. The difference is that, the rounded bottom always has an angle to match any angle presented by the front, crest, and trailing edges..

All boats react to waves somehow, The dock will remain stable.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,909
38
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
There's a boat I like to refer to as a modified Pirogue and it's the Bayou Skiff at Uncle John boats.
Here is a link to it. http://unclejohns.com/bysk14/Default.htm

I built one and it's pretty stable in fact a friend of mine liked it so much I gave it to him for fishing shallow water areas in the Indian River Lagoon.

Matt at Jem Watercraft has a couple of boat plans in the same category.
http://www.jemwatercraft.com/Crawdad.php
plus in the same list he has a Paddle board plans.

Chuck.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
Stability is related to how much force it takes to capsize. Our perception of that experience is something else. Your ability to deal with those forces will be different from others. Hard to compare apples to oranges. Our generalized statements and personal opinions may not answer your specific needs.
"I need to move around when I start cramping" may prevent any paddle powered design from suiting you. You could try to find a way to test some different boats. This would at least point you in the right direction, or you could go buy a stack of wood and start building boats until you get one that might work.
If you are comfortable using a small john boat, the Ogeechee River Boat could work. That is probably my last guess.
 
Last edited:

Neil74

Member
Mar 9, 2019
11
0
63
A question: have you considered a bjt bigger boat with a trolling motor?
I had a 12 foot aluminum V-hull with a 10 hp Evinrude that would hurt my back in choppy water, the way I had to sit with the tiller and rocking from the slight chop would tear my back up. I moved on to a 17 foot Cajun bass boat with a 175 Black Max Mercury but hitting rough chop tore me up. I then bought a 19 foot Pontoon boat and it was a pleasure until the wind picked up and I had to manhandle that beast by myself at the dock and putting it on and off the trailer. I was doing good with the Grumman canoe and only had one bad spill playing with an anchor in the Gulf:) I hadn't learned to run the anchor line on pulleys and drop it off the bow:) Lucky I was only in 8 foot of water and was able to dive for my pole and gear:) I got interested in a wooden canoe because I saw a gentleman on St Rd 52 hauling a real looker on a trailer but lost him in traffic. I have found a neighbor with a15 foot aluminum canoe, narrower than the beam on my old one but I am going to try it and make a decision.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,113
79
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Tha Au Sable River here in Michigan, has what they call "quality" fishing areas. Where, when a fish is caught, it has to be (1) caught on a barbless hook, and (2) thrown back in. Now, I'm not a fisherman since I was 14 years old, but even I can recognize that is a fishing lie. There's no quality to that fishing at all. Further downstream, the sane folk are fishing.

But, for paddling and camping, the entire river is the gem of the northwoods.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
242
5
76
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Niel,
You might take a look at the Matt's craw dad at JEM watercraft. I've built a couple of them in SS&G. Very stable, lightweight, and short enough to go in pick up, even the newer "short beds". Also it has a transom if a small trolling motor is your thing. I highly recommend this little boat.
Good luck,
Andy
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,462
14
After rereading all the post I believe you had two questions. One was, would a pirogue be a good platform for "inshore waters etc." with my stability and health issues? Normally a pirogue would be an excellent choice for these conditions but probably not for your circumstances. Based on the boating experiences you stated, I am not sure any design will be satisfactory. One route to try could be to pick one of the larger(wider) more stable paddling boats and go for it. It may not work well enough but you will have the satisfaction of building a boat. That is a rewarding and enjoyable experience in itself.
The other question was has anyone used hard wood flooring to build a boat. I have not. Wooden boats are built from wood so it should work,but some woods are better for the task. Personally I would pick a more traditional boat wood especially if this was my first build.