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Stitch and Glue No Plans

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,645
35
Your tumblehome panel was puzzling to me. I could not compute why/how the panel appeared to be the same width from one end to the other. Then I realized the ends came together on sort of a reverse stem angle, not ending in a point. Looks different to my eyes but should be easier to build. Did you do it this way because you are building stitch and glue?
Not disagreeing but for my knowledge, why the V bottom?
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
398
12
77
Central Kansas and Central Texas
BeeKeeper, I have built S&G with both types of tumble home ends. When I Shortened the sides of the JEM Crawdad I was trying to reduce the wind signature, so I terminated the sides in a reverse angle. It may be the reverse angle is easier. On this boat I feel I should have made the tumble home end angle more vertical, because I’d rather have the tumble home panels more vertical. They would be stronger and easier to brace. I realized my mistake too late.
The V bottom is because the boat I was copying (kinda) has a V bottom. I have used that boat for many years and like the overall characteristics, especially the stability. Most of the “factory” Pirogues in the North Louisiana area had the V Bottom. Water Moccasin, tidecraft, Gator, southern, etc. My guess is it had to do with molds and adding strength with angles working with fiberglass. When Matt designed the Crawdad, I remember him saying that’s as stable as I can make it unless we used a v bottom. So bottom line is, I don’t have a preference, just trying it out.


This build has unlocked the mystery of how much rainbow in sides,flair,rocker, end angles, form placement, and probably other stuff I don’t know. I had never ventured far from plans, but will no doubt do it again. there are grandkids and greatgrands, that (hopefully) that need to know this stuff! I’m going to credit you and Joey,the light came on!

Good Fish’n,
Andy
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,645
35
Does your V in the bottom form a "tunnel hull" of sorts or does the tip of the V point down?
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
398
12
77
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Is that an optical illusion - or is that vee inverted into a shallow tunnel? I’m like JD Beekeeper in questioning here.
Yep, it's a V, not a tunnel as it flattens near both ends. the factory boats like this have a small keel in the middle of the v. I suspepct the keel is to strengthen the fiberglass. I may or may not add it.I deletted my last post. it was duplicated 3 times and I wasn't smart enough to rdit it so I just deleted it. May play with it later.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,793
135
83
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Thank you, Andy.

They are; it is up to each of us to “not let the old man in. To keep him at bay. So we each stay our active vigil. Active with Grandkids; active with a sander or other tool in our hands; active at moving in exploration and laughter. We keep active, because moving targets are hard to hit. And, the old man moves on to take the slothful. Paddlers are just too difficult for him to catch. And so are hikers and bikers.
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
398
12
77
Central Kansas and Central Texas
Time to start the epoxy and fiberglass.This picture is the saturation epoxy coat that is intended to impregnate the wood and provide a chemical bond for the glass coat. I have been known to skip this step, but my guess is that it helps.

A light sanding and ready to drape the cloth. on boats with a tumble home I like to turn the boat on its side to take advantage of Gravity and avoid trying to fill cloth upside down. 25 or 30 inch wide pieces will cover the side, and over half the bottom. When I turn the other side I get double glass down the middle of the bottom, ends and high wear areas.



One side done.


Now to glassing the inside. I like to glass the inside in pieces, usually the bottom in one piece, then the tumble home and side in one piece, turning the boat to have better access and use gravity. Using the panel patterns to cut the cloth works well.





started the decks while epoxy sets. laid up an outline on the table,glued up the strips to rough
shape, then cut to about an inch oversize. then glued them in place. I’ll have pictures of the deck after they are trimmed.




About 4 fill coats of epoxy later






I’m looking forward to wrapping this one up. More later.
Good Fish’n
Andy
 

oldbuffpilot

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
398
12
77
Central Kansas and Central Texas
The Short Fat Wuhan Pirogue is complete and ready to go fishing! :

Finishing touches were the decks and inwhales. the inwhales, cowling or whatever it is called was a real challenge. the tumblehome lays way too flat, to be conventional.That means the border supports would have to bend extremely tight in two planes. I finally kinda copied Beekeepers cowing idea and adapted it to fit my purpose. I also added some graphics to the decks
Final stats:
Length 8' 9" target 9’4”
width beam 31 ⅝" target 30”
width bottom 25" target ??
flare 35 target 35degrees
depth 71/2" target 9”
rocker bow 13/4" target 11/2"
rocker stern 13/4" target 1"
weight 14.8 target light
3mm cedar strips, 4 oz cloth overlapped bottom and side joints. Pine trim supports

Lessons from this build.
Building strip, stitch and glue without plans is much harder than you would think. Aiming for specific dimensions such as rocker, flare, width, and length further complicate it more than just looking for a general concept. I missed most of my target dimensions anyway and changed them to “just look right”


2.Next time build a model, at least the major parts. For my small brain, I had to physically make changes to realize the interrelated effects of rainbow curve sides, end angles,rocker, flare, width, form placement ect. Joeys technique of clamping forms in place with a 90 degree wood piece is a real saver.Luan would be a real good idea. I was handicapped by the Chinese virus shutdown,i couldn’t get luan for patterns so I used cedar strips. The upside is that I went ahead and made a boat,instead of just patterns, I started out just trying to learn and have some plans for a starting point.

3. Making changes one at a time, and a little bit at a time makes for easier understanding, of what’s happening.
4. Be willing to miss some of your goals. For instance I had the rocker right on, after stitching and glueing the floor in place I’d gained at least a half inch of rocker on each end.
5. Search the forum and ask questions on the forum, that’s the only way I pulled this off!
6. Joeys post from years back was right… leave out most of the center part of the boat, weight will go down! Also the save weight tips from the whole forum work well. Especially Chucks efforts with door skins As I progressed I knew it was light weight, but never expected under 15 pounds. It is firmer and stronger feeling than any previous build.

7. Although frustrating at times it was a real fun challenge and I’ll do it again. Made me appreciate Matts computer, and envy the knowledge of members on the forum.. I got close to the boat I wanted! Success!
Hope to fish it next week.
Thanks to those who offered advice and encouragement,

Andy
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oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
10,256
90
77
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
Transporting it , tie it down really good , that light a slight breeze will take it away.
Andy , That's one Hell of a Boat. :) Any fish worth it's salt would be proud to be seen in it.
Not sure about thee rest of the country but over here we would call it a Punt or Duck Boat. The one's I've seen could not hold a candle to the looks of yours , outstanding job.