Clicky

Tales from the Log of the Ruptured Duck

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,027
72
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
A difference here is, that when a railroad is abandoned, they pull the tracks, ties, and stone ballast. Some are then rolled to smooth them. Some of the crushed stone ballast always remains, and this firms up the surface. Many, are simply blacktopped. Michigan has more miles of such Rails to Trails than any other state, I've heard. So, when I ride an abandoned RR right of way here, there are no rails.

Some trails receive executive treatment - shelters, benches, etc. All trails run through small towns every few miles, usually about 5-15 miles. Restaurants, motels, etc are available. Some lf my paddling buddjes camp behind a restaurant, pizzaria, etc.

On the trail, you will see bikes, skate boards, roller blades, walkers, and horseback riders. And, once in a while, some horse apples.
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,870
36
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
Same in Florida , rails and cross ties pulled..
The rails to trails are both paved and left as they were in the natural state. The Florida Trail takes advantage of the rails to trails for it's use. So far state wide for all different types of recerational use we have 812 miles established and 432 miles in the works for the near future. I would be willing to bet there will be a lot more when the 432 are established.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,027
72
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Well, the bike trip that Charlie and I are taking has grown (maybe that should read "groan"?) It's now about 60 miles. Actually, that's probably better. More scenery, and I'll learn more. We're now riding from Cadillac to Farwell. We also reversed ditection, which

I've been playing around with the trailer some more, and am learning more. The mointing flange that the trailer connects to, is a steel plate about 2" in diameter. It slides onto the end of the rear axle, and then you screw on the axle nut, and tighten it on. Sticking out, pointing backwards is a little prong/shaft, about 2" long and 3/8" in diameter. The trailer tongue has a tube on its end that slides over that little shaft, and a steel pin drops into the aligned holes in the tube and shaft.

Originally, instead of having that prong/shaft lying level, it was pointing slightly up. As I had written earlier, the nose of the trailer was riding high. Todsy, I repositioned that bracket to aim the shaft slightly downwards. VOILA'!! The trailer reoriented itself, and now lies level! This will make transporting a load much easier. The trailer bed angle seems very sensitive to the angle of thr hitch. A surprise.

I'm figuring out how to load the trailer and keep the load stabilized so the trailer has good balance, the load is protected, and the whole rig won't jiggle, wobble, or cause problems. Soon, I'll post a picture of this rig, and show why I selected this equipment for the job I have in mind for it. While this little trailer seems adaptable to many tasks, other jobs might be handled easier with a different design.
 
Last edited:

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,027
72
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
TEST RIDE

Well, little by little, we're getting organized. Charlie has a lot of "points of interest" along the way for us to visit. I have some menu items that he likes. When I mentioned the freeze-dried refried beans that I'll bring along, he immediately thought of a
- - - ting contest. sigh

While the big ride is a ways off, Charlie wants to do a shorter ride. He wants to test me to see if the longer ride is really a good idea. That isn't what he saud, but I can smell it. I've been making local rides - 2 to 6 miles - here, about three per week. Now, I'll start pulling the trailer on these rides, just to get more "training effect".

The 8 mile route from Odin to Owosso is pretty level, and paved, so I think that I can drag this 81 year old body along it, have lunch, and ride back. As long as I don't eat a big lunch. It'll be fun.
 

NWDad

Well-Known Member
Oct 4, 2015
54
1
Looking forward to updates on the rides and some photos of your set up. I am currently working on converting my 2wheeler to a trike. My balance is not what it use to be do to accidents years ago. This way I can keep on riding which I love to do. All I have left is the wheels Cor the back axle. I will post some pics when I get done.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,027
72
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
I'm behind the power curve on getting photos in. Sorry bout that.

I think that most of my nit-noy (trivial) mods are done. The trailer hitch is a genius design, but I found it not totally assembled inside. Some poor kid in a Chinese sweat factory was probably in a hurry. I'll get piccies out before the August ride.

So far, I've ridden several 5-6 mile rides with it empty, and 10-12 poind loads. I'm planning a day ride of 16 miles with a 40 pound load. I'll probably need to readjust ME after that.

Now, converting a 2 wheeler into a 3 wheeler is quite an undertaking. It won't be a recumbant, I'm guessing? A fellow near me had a third wheel rigged to the frame and forkhead. It arched out to the left side, just in front of his left foot. Looked to be about 1"-1 1/2" diameter tubing, with a 16"-20" bike wheel on the end. The bike sat almost perfectly upright, leaning just the least leftward.

He had a couple of short straps fastened to the arch that snapped onto his dog's harness. The dog trotted alongside the bike, front shoulders in under the arch, with the third wheel by its left shoulder. He rode slowly so the dog could trot along easily. Still, the dog looked stressed, to me.