Clicky

Tales from the Log of the Ruptured Duck

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
And isn't it hunbling! We're a pretty small pirce of a very large puzzle. When we Googlize "earth history condensed into one year" it says about what you cited, but with dimensions of time instead of distance.

Mathematically, they are very close to the same. Psychologically, they are identical. We are very tiny.

History books are trip reports of our magnificent journeys. The stone age was just a few seconds ago.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
I read an interesting comment about the earlyTexas Rangers and Cherokees. The Comanche were still in the stone age. The Rangers were using muzzle loaders. The stone age guys were said to have an arrow in the air most of the time - one right after the other. The muzzle loaders were good for one shot, and impossible to reload while riding along on a horse.

Not until the Colt revolvers, were the Rangers better armed than the stone age warriors. It was also said that the Comanche were the world's best light cavalry at the time. IE: they outrode the Rangers.

But, something similar could be said about the Sioux and others against Custer. And, while Custer's men had single-shot rifles, many Indians carried repeaters.
 
Last edited:

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Well the new, little chair arrived a couple of days ago. It will be entertaining for the other fellas, watching an old cripple getting down - and back up again. It is, in fact, a small framework used to make a stadium seat, using a sleeping pad to cushion my butt. The simplicty and light weight of it appeal to me. But, the seat isn't for everybody. And neither is canoeing, single malt scotch, or chocolate ice cream.

Well, maybe the ice cream is for everybody? I guess.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
REGRESSIVE DAY DREAMS?

About a week ago, I read an article about flying ultralight aircraft, and got interested. Oh, these thoughts can be both enlightening, and debilitating. Though I quit flying a couple of years ago, evidently it never quite left me? sigh

i had kind of thought that the Duck was a light aircraft, at a max gross weight of 2,300 pounds, it definitely isn’t big. But, an ultralight cannot have more than one seat, nor weigh any more than 254 pounds, empty weight. Fuel, pilot, and a thermos of coffee could easily double that. They cruise at about 50-55mph, and have a 5 gallon fuel tank, and take off and land at about 35mph.

These are not intended for flying a 500 mile trip, nor even a 100 mile trip. They’re meant for cruising low and slow over the countryside, along a stream or river, over fields of waving grain, avoiding large airports, watching wildlife. FAA basically pays little attention to these “flying lawnmowers”. No physical exam nor license is required. Buy it, hop in, and fly away. Albeit not even as fast as those cars down there. But, I always enjoyed gawking at the countryside, so this could be right down my alley.

So, for several days now, I’ve agonized over whether or not to take the plunge. Julie and I talked it over several times, from several angles. In the final analysis we decided to push more bicycling activities. The exercise of pedaling, loading and unloading, etc. will certainly be beneficial. And, a lot less expensive. So, the focus of our recreation will continue to include biking. We’ll be stopping for coffee, hamburgs, and - of course - ice cream.

See ya on the trails!
 
Last edited:

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Ahhhh. Ummmmhhh. Uhhhhhh i’m going to get one of those ultralights. The draw of sitting up there - not very high - poking along slow like, watching the panorama unroll as I ease along is JUST TOO MUCH TO IGNORE. They’re easy to fly. No involvement with FAA at all. No physical or license required. Just get some familiarization training in a similar 2 seater.

There are many engines offered, from 28Hp to 63Hp. Researching these engines, I quickly culled out some that aren’t a good choice for me. The one I selected is a rock solid dependable one, of 50 horsepower.. I also will get large, tundra wheels so that landing and taking off in rough conditions is better. And, a larger fuel tank. At 3 gallons per hour (gph), the original 5 gallon tank has too little range.

With the larger engine, tank, and tundra tires, I could carry camp gear and go on visits, or an extended tour. sigh

What can I say.
 

texastom

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2013
146
2
Dallas
Hey Jack, which one did you end up putting in first place? I too have pondered the inexpensive option provided by ultralights. The time and $$ required to get safe and proficient in a GA single is not worth it to me now or in the near future. Ultra light or maybe LSA seem like good alternatives for local puttering. I have to sit for my CFI renewal this weekend, even though it's been 20+years since I've instructed I keep the CFI rating "just in case".
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Tom, I bought an Aerolite103. I opted for the 50 hp Firth engine, not the 28hp. Also 17” tundra tires for roughr sod strips, larger fuel tank, radio, digital instruments, LED strobes
Wingtip position lights, and fluorescent orange & yellow skins on wing & tail.Go to UFLYIT.COM. Call them; ask Dennis all the questions you can think of.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Thanks, Tom. I hear these birds usually fly 500’-1,000’ AGL. Mornings and evenings, when air is calm is prime time.

I plan to do a lot of looking. The dictionary calls it reconnoitering, but I think that’s misleading. RE-connoitering would suggest that you’ve already been there once before - doing connoitering. And, if you return, then that would be reconnoitering. So, when I first fly over an area, I’m connoitering.

I like to explore rivers and lakes. There are some pretty places scattered out across Michigan, the Water Wonderland. Lord, I do like observing Mother Nature! I’d like to carry a bit of camp gear. Fly the morning through, land and pitch camp, nap and lounge, and do some local-area connoitering later in the day. A 2-4 day trip could be fun.
And introspective too. I suppose.

.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
Tom, I reviewed the Skyarrow. I like the composite fuselage, cockpit, trailing nose gear, etal. Nice bird. What kind kf engine is on there?

One thing that Cessna erred with on the 172, was the McPherson nose strut. A spring steel spar with a castoring wheel would have been lighter, simpler, cheaper, less maintenance, and much better on sod..
 

texastom

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2013
146
2
Dallas
They have Rotax engines. Agree on Cessna nose wheel stuts. Our CFI renewal instructor last wknd flies a C185! Solves that problem, as long as you have happy feet.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
13,235
87
82
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
I’ve never flown a tail dragger, only nose draggers. But I fail to see the reason for jabbing rudder pedals instead of holding and varying the position. But then, I’m not as accomplished a pilot as others.
 

texastom

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2013
146
2
Dallas
I think I have about 15 hours in tail draggers. They are not too bad, but I've never had a tough crosswind to deal with. You are right though, not really a jab unless you're in trouble, otherwise just steady movement.