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Temporary keel strips?

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,411
13
#21
Many thanks to all for posting. I see many ideas to try.

Anchoring or dragging a chain may work, but you would constantly have to raise and lower it to move and fish. If the wind is strong it may be the only way. When I used the rope and chain anchor it slowed or stopped the boat from drifting, but not necessarily in position to make an accurate cast. A wind sock, sea anchor,drift anchor, or similar arrangements would not work in the stumps and trees where I fish. I have used one on another boat.

I have fished long enough to know you sometimes have to accept and go with the conditions you are given. I am only looking for ways to stabilize my boat (keep it in position to make a cast and retrieve) in a slight to light breeze. I have also been trying to find the best way to paddle my boat. I don't know if this relates to the wind drift, but the boat seems to paddle best when I sit and paddle facing backwards when headed into the wind. The bow always wants to point down wind.

JEM
I really like your skeg design. I made one that clamped on with a C clamp. Only tried one time because it was not convenient. Would it have to extend below the bottom of the boat to be effective? Do I need a skeg on the back or a leeboard on the front?

beekeeper
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,931
57
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#22
Beekeeper,

I used to have to paddle my late wife around so she could fish. I was a well trained puppy dog, and would put the boat where she pointed. Maybe you need to train a Grandkid to paddle you around? I suppose you could let them fish from time to time. Might get to be kinda pleasant?
 

pereaux

Active Member
Apr 13, 2009
35
0
#23
Hello, this is my first attempt at posting, but I was wandering if some sort of strips simlar to outside chines would help to hold you in place when fishing. I am bnuilding boat # 11 the way I have been taught, and we leave the bottom extending outward about a half inch or so and it helps our style to hold. If I wern,t so dumb about the computer thing I could post a picture. I just don,t think I can try it. ps. I have been reading posts a long time. I got scared I couldn't read any more without posting something so this was my try. Please ,accept me in, and somebody get this post back in subject. thanks
 

JEM

Well-Known Member
#25
beekeeper said:
JEM
I really like your skeg design. I made one that clamped on with a C clamp. Only tried one time because it was not convenient. Would it have to extend below the bottom of the boat to be effective? Do I need a skeg on the back or a leeboard on the front?

beekeeper
You get quite a bit of directional control when it's hung off the back like that. I'd say drop it about 4" below the waterline and extend out the back about 6-8". That should be a good start.
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,931
57
81
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#26
Welcome, Pereaux, please don't let the sane folks on here scare you away. They go home about midnight, and the rest of us take over. Keep the foil hat on, otherwise, Gerry (Bear's Buddy) will vector in thought control and you'll be buying him beer for life.
 

pereaux

Active Member
Apr 13, 2009
35
0
#27
Well thanks guys for the welcome in. The boat I am building is a 10', wide 28". deep 11.5 " paddle boat of evolution to this area. It is best described as a cypress pirougue with flat bottom rocker with no points at each end to cut reeds , as there are none in this area. They are mostly made of sinker cypress. This one is cypress with fir plywood bottom wich extends past the sides and only needs a small keel in some instances. If I could become computer educated I would like to show you. They are simlar to a punt but narrower with 25 degree flare on side. no chines. easy to paddle.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,411
13
#28
pereaux
Wellcome :) Good to have you posting. Don't worry about mistakes. I'm keeping them busy correcting mine no one will probably notice. :lol: One small piece of advice, don't post a riddle unless you like to type.

beekeeper
 

a Bald Cypress

Well-Known Member
May 7, 2007
577
0
75
Northwest Louisiana
#30
pereaux said:
. The boat I am building is a 10', wide 28". deep 11.5 " paddle boat of evolution to this area. They are mostly made of sinker cypress. This one is cypress with fir plywood bottom wich extends past the sides and only needs a small keel in some instances.
They are simlar to a punt but narrower with 25 degree flare on side. no chines. easy to paddle.
Let me think about this for an hour or two.

10 feet wide 28 inches deep and 11.5 inches long. I bet it will go sidewise better than it goes forward. :lol:

It also sounds like he has been making midnight shopping around Tick & Kieths place ta get the sinker cypress.


P.S. Yo Pereaux, the next time ya visit Tick at midnight, I could use enough cypress ta make another canoe. I'se got me % bucks saved up just ta pay ya for your time. :wink:
 

dangermouse01

Well-Known Member
Sep 8, 2006
312
1
Palm Bay, FL (East coast)
#31
a Bald Cypress said:
pereaux said:
. The boat I am building is a 10', wide 28". deep 11.5 " paddle boat of evolution to this area. They are mostly made of sinker cypress. This one is cypress with fir plywood bottom wich extends past the sides and only needs a small keel in some instances.
They are simlar to a punt but narrower with 25 degree flare on side. no chines. easy to paddle.
Let me think about this for an hour or two.

10 feet wide 28 inches deep and 11.5 inches long. I bet it will go sidewise better than it goes forward. :lol:
Your mis-reading.

The boat pereaux is building is a 10'-er, 28" wide with a depth of 11.5".

DM
 

oldsparkey

Well-Known Member
Aug 25, 2003
9,817
31
75
Central , Florida
www.southernpaddler.com
#33
WOW......

That is one slick looking boat , bet it will get into some shinny water and get you back out. :D noticed a motor mount on the stern , what type of motor do you use ?

Right off hand and the 1st thing that popped in my mind was a smaller Go Devil would do the trick if the boat was a bit wider.

Chuck.
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,411
13
#35
pereaux
Sharp looking boat and young man. Did he help with the building?
How is the seat made? It looks like a wide Uncle John Pirogue Seat.

beekeeper
 

pereaux

Active Member
Apr 13, 2009
35
0
#36
Yes ya'll ,that boys 12 and a fine grandson. He did help with the boat some and I have given it to him. I built one earlier and he didn't help so I give it to his dad.The one I finished today is for his 13 yr. old cousin. The seat is removable and built of white oak and cypress. It kinda looks like an Uncle John but just a sturdy wide rigid seat that comes apart in two pieces. And hey I ain't took nobody's cypress. I hope to meet them men .Seed tick and kieth some day. They sure have shared a lot of info. I cut a log up on halves for a man and this was my share. Yes I am going to build one of them keels and give it a try on the paddle boats when paddling in the river. I believe that would be real handy. Just remove it when going in back water. To answer the question asked about the motor. It is always asked for (the transom) around here. Everone seems in a hurry but me. Or just down right lazy. These guys bass fish with the boats and use little small trolling motors mounted in back. most cut the shaft so they don't stick up too high. I perfer the longer boats as they tract better when traveling a ways. mine is 14'. thanks guys
 

seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,141
4
Denham Springs, LA
#37
looks good pereaux, i'm sure those boys will enjoy it

looks a lot like those 17th century punts - i believe nockatee built one similar

had a deck on each end so you could stand up and pole it
 

gbinga

Well-Known Member
Nov 7, 2008
736
2
Hoschton, GA
#38
pereaux - That is a GREAT looking boat. Welcome to the forum!

Beekeeper,

I think everyone has the same problem with getting the boat to sit still. I have the same problem with a 14ft aluminum john boat.

Keeping the boat simple, stable, light, and easy to handle means (probably) a light weight boat with a flat bottom. A little puff of wind is gonna move a boat like that.

There isn't much you can do without adding complication to the rig. Deeper keels would help, but they add weight and get hung up on things. The removable skeg looks like a great idea, but it is an added complication (more weight, an added piece of equipment to keep track of and lug around...) and it can get hung up on things. And neither idea is going to help if the wind is coming from forward or aft.

I like the idea of a drift anchor or Chuck's idea of the chain. The chain wouldn't be much trouble unless the water was deep. And a drift anchor doesn't have to be as complicated as you might think. It can be as simple as a two gallon bucket with a rope tied to the handle. And it doesn't have to be deep - as long as it is in the water, it makes drag. Rigging it with a short rope means you can pull it up quick and easy.

Here is another thought about a chain - - if it ain't on the bottom, it won't make much drag. Just pull the rope enough to get the chain off the bottom, and leave it in the water while you move to the next tree. I've not tried it that way, but I bet it would work. It would save all the aggravation and noise of actually hauling the chain up into the boat every time you move.

George
 

beekeeper

Well-Known Member
Mar 4, 2009
1,411
13
#39
gbinga
After many replies here and other places, it seems drift/movement while trying to remain motionless in small boats is a given. It is a handicap when the fish demand a precise presentation. I have a boat designed to catch bass and go fast. It does both well and I love it. My goal for this boat was to fish protected lake coves and to float small creeks and bayous with my son and grandson, in a simple ,easy, relaxed, and hassle free way. Many of the suggestions I have tried. They work to a degree for some situations. Most will add a degree of hassle to use. An example, the temp. skeg I clamped on to try. It became stuck on bottom when I tried to beach the boat to load, not to mention trying to install it when launching. The chain will act as an anchor or a drag if adjusted just so. My experience was a windy day and I was trying to slow the boat enough to drift and fish. It would work o.k. until the water depth changed, then it would stop or go too fast, and the rope would need adjusting. The chain anchor/drag may work, if I can figure a way to mount it on the front of the boat and it operate simply. When I get back to my shop and boat I plan to experiment with several ideas. May have to accept drift/movement but would like to reduce it to a less stressful level.

beekeeper
 

seedtick

Well-Known Member
Jul 22, 2006
1,141
4
Denham Springs, LA
#40
my Dad was a fly fisherman back before the invention of trolling motors and he'd take Grandpa with him to paddle while he fished

Now paddling while fly fishing isn't much work , Grandpa at the time was approaching geezerdom (60+), liked to be on the water, didn't care if he fished or not, and enjoyed the day out with his son.