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yard sale kayak

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#1
I picked up this Phoenix Poke Boat Appalachian today at a yard sale. 13' 9" x 24" beam..... 30 lbs.....very rounded bottom.





Seems to have been stored out of the sun and rain. It has some fairly deep scratches and a couple of small cracks above the waterline, but seems to be quite solid. The paddle is a Silver Creek Heavy Duty in decent shape....feathered 90 degrees. I thought it was a cheap paddle stuck under the deck until I paid the lady a ridiculously low price and picked the boat up to load it in my truck. It's laminated from several pieces of wood and covered with glass.

I ddn't find out much on the Net. This model has been discontinued, but a coparably sized current model is running around $2000. This must have been a hot set-up in , I'm guessing , the 80's.

I sent an email out to the company to find out more information. Has anyone had any experience with a kayak like this?

Joey
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,762
43
80
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#2
Joey, I don't have any direct experience with Poke Boats. They used to imagine themselves an avante guarde boat designer. Kind of a legend in their own mind. They had a short, aluminum kayak-looking thing that was advertised as being "Everything a canoe isn't!"
Yours looks like they entered into the touring kayak field; looks like it will perform well in the quiet waters there.
Go on line to "Canoe and Kayak Magazine", and look up their buyers' directory for information on the boat and paddle.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#3
Thanks, Jack. I'll do that.

I just got finished cleaning it up some and found out one annoying design flaw. There's almost no way to clean the inside and dump the water out. You turn it over any way and the lip on the cowling just lets the water go around the cockpit opening. From the looks of what was in there, EVERY piece of rock, shell, stick and sand that the boat ever encountered was still trapped inside. :roll: I managed to do a decent job with a rag on a stick

Waiting for the rain to stop to go for a test ride in the bayou.

Joey
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#5
Shop vac.....good tip.

Just got back from the test ride. Uhhhhh..........not all that great. Paddling up current (1/2 - 3/4 mph) the boat weaved back and forth with every stroke. If you didn't catch it in time, it would then become very hard to turn. Down current was much better. It tracked straighter and had very impressive speed. In both directions, when I stopped paddling it would pull immediately to one side or the other.

I measured the rocker when I got back, and like I thought, it had plenty .... over 3". The boat was probably designed for down river paddling with a heavier paddler and gear and with the capacity for a little rough water.

Stability was good and very predictable. The cockpit is the usual "put one leg in, then the other " type with good foot pegs and thigh supports in the right place. Very comfortable form fitting seat, too.

I'll probably spruce it up some and pass it on to the next owner.

Joey
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#6
I took the boat out for another spin in the bayou. More manageable tracking this time but still wanted to turn on a dime. Turning is what it wants to do and does it well. It will swap ends instantly when asked. Manuevers in tight quarters like a boat 4 feet shorter.

I get what you guys mean by the stability of a round bottom. Sitting two inches off of the bottom, it's pretty stable when level. It is more predictable as it leans over. Maybe not MORE stable, but more predictable. Leaning way over, the boat was really predictable until the water got up to the deck line. That's way more lean than you would get in normal paddling. An expert in white water may get there but not this Cajun!

Oh, found a few more cracks. Par for the course, eh. All of them will be easy to fix though.

Joey
 

Kayak Jack

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2003
12,762
43
80
Okemos / East Lansing Michigan
#7
Try temporarily affixing (duct tape, the handyman's secret weapon) a short skeg and see what you think? Even a short (3"-4"), flimsy, plastic skeg should help tracking immensely. Using a plastic divider from a 3 ring binder, or a flexible plastic cutting board, tape 2 or 3 layers together. Spread the top ends sideways and tape it onto your boat.
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#8
I really don't think I'll keep the boat. It's just not my style, so it'll get spruced up and hopefully sold.

Miss Tina at Phoenix Kayaks found out that the boat was built in 1979 and was "probably" made with kevlar. The company no longer makes this model but it sold for over a $1000 .......in 1979 dollars. I bought a brand new Chevy in '79 for $7800, so this was a expensive kayak in it's day.

I did a bit more research and found out it was indeed a whitewater boat. The big, broad bladed paddle supports that idea too.

I scuffed the whole boat down with a Scothbrite pad and will fix up several small cracks and dings with epoxy. I might put it on Craig's list or just set it out by Hwy 1.



Joey
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#9
The kayak went to it's new owner this morning. I stopped at a buddy's house and mentioned the kayak I was fixing up. Before I knew it, he was following me home and putting a ridiculous amount of money in my hand. He actually gave me a little more than the asking price. He had a boat from the same company and had lost it in a divorce. He was overjoyed not to have to spend over $2000 to buy a new one. Win --- Win. Got enough to buy the materials for a top notch boat.

Joey
 

jdupre'

Well-Known Member
Sep 9, 2007
2,000
3
South Louisiana
#11
Well, Jack, he didn't get much back besides his boat. I always thought in a divorce things were split 50/50. It must be some kind of female math that she used, because her half was closer to 80%. :(

Joey