1. The forums software has been upgraded and we are still sorting out its quirks.
    Please relay any problems you encounter. Thanks for your patience!
    Dismiss Notice

Truck Boat #2

Discussion in 'Pirogues' started by beekeeper, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Started a new pirogue. It will be similar to my last boat but with some small modifications. A few inches shorter to fit in the truck better and some cosmetic changes for the sides and decks(breasthooks).
    Fitting the chine logs at the stems:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    beekeeper
     
  2. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    After the logs are attached to the bottom I turn it over and trim the excess.
    [​IMG]
    It is supported on my strongback(not attached to any forms) and the stems are installed.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The bottom is then shaped to the rocker I desire by moving the height of the strongback stations as needed.
    [​IMG]

    beekeeper
     
  3. jdupre'

    jdupre' Well-Known Member

    Boy, what a completely different method of building than I'm used to. Seems to work mighty fine for ya. With your way, you can set the rocker exactly like you want. My way is maybe just a little less precise.
    I think I told you this already, but a friend of mine grew up in Harvey, across the river from New Orleans. His neighbor started a pirogue by pounding four foot long sections of cypress into the ground at the right angle and the right distance apart to form the stems of his pirogues. He bent the sides and nailed them to the stems, put in the ribs and then nailed on the bottom. After that , he just cut the boat free of the stem pieces and the pirogue was ready for paint. It was a building jig and building table all in one.

    What kind of ply are you using on this one?

    Joey
     
  4. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    It is different but I think it works well. It seems to eliminate some of the guessing if you are building without plans or patterns. I don't have to guess at how much swag to cut or how much side flair to use in the sides for X" of rocker or the beam I want.. Like building a house you start with the foundation (bottom) and build onto that. Frame it (chin logs, stems, ribs, etc,), install walls (boat sides), and then the roof(decks).

    beekeeper
     
  5. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Interesting, JD.
     
  6. jdupre'

    jdupre' Well-Known Member

    Thought of the day: The Irwin clamp company just LOVES boat builders! :mrgreen:
     
  7. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Sometimes, I wrapped a rope around, or tied it across. Then used a shory stick to twist it tight. It's sometimes called a Spanish windlass.
     
  8. oldsparkey

    oldsparkey Well-Known Member

    Good looking progress , it will be interesting to see the finished boat.

    Chuck.
     
  9. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Can not have too many clamps. Made these clamp helpers to hold the side panels to the chine logs.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    beekeeper
     
  10. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Pee-row tweezers!
     
  11. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    I had intentions of making some patterns from cheap ply so the next build would simply be a matter of drawing out the lines onto the good ply or use them to make strip panels. I should have just built the boat as I usually do because I have never built two boats the same. Long story short. pattern was not correct and I built two sides that would not work. The flimsy ply's butt splice moved or itwas too stiff to show the proper curve. A very good learning experience but a waste of time and work.
    This boat's sides are 8" high and flair 30deg. at its widest point. I found out because of the 5"+ arch needed to match the rocker I wanted, two 12" X 8' panels glued end to end to form a straight board will not work. As I have done before 11" wide panels joined at the proper angle will work . They will make a board that appears bent or shaped as a shallow v.
    [​IMG]
    The angle is easy to determine. I clamp in place one panel and then the other, overlapping where I want my splice to be. Marked the end of the top panel on to the other. Removed the panels, and made the splice at the angle indicated. I did scarf joints so I had to allow for the extra length needed.
    [​IMG]
    After the joint cures completely I reattached the sides and traced along bottom edge of the floor and the stem pieces where they meet the sides. Removed the sides and marked the top edge of the sides close to the shape I am looking for. Their final shape will be made after the sides are attached and can be turned over. I then cut out the outline but stayed proud of the lines .
    [​IMG]

    beekeeper
     
  12. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Yeah, the first two panels on the bottom have to look like a pair of parentheses.
     
  13. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Last picture for now. It will be a few days before I can start back work on the boat. Sides are attached and planed flush with the bottom.
    [​IMG]
    I clamped a batten to the gunnel edge of the side panel to get a feel for how the lines flow. Anxious to turn it upright and proceed with the tumblehome and breashooks.

    beekeeper
     
  14. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Looks good. JD. I particularly like the 90 horse outbosrd you're side mounting on it. If the fish aren't biting, you can take us Grandkids water skiing!
     
  15. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Sorry I overlooked the plywood question. It is sanded ply, BC pine, from the box store. Saw a stack with some decent pieces and could not pass them up. Naturally after I started working with them they weren't as "clear" as I thought.

    beekeeper
     
  16. Wannabe

    Wannabe Well-Known Member

    JD,
    I can't wait to see what it looks like right side up. Looks dang good up side down. Are you taking any breaks from boat building to go fishing?
    Bob
     
  17. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Sometimes I take a break from boat building and go fishing, or do I I take a break from fishing to build a boat. I don't know which , but their both fun. :D
    Made a couple tries for the fish but not much luck. When I could go conditions were not the best. Lots of rain and cooler than norm temperatures.
    I am not sure of the outcome or even the path I'll take, but I want the tumblehome panels to flow into the breasthooks at a more natural manner than my last two boats. I am challenged by the complexities of boat design and building.

    beekeeper
     
  18. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    It's supposed to be a bit of a challenge, JD. If it were easy, then EVERYBODY would be doing it.
     
  19. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Finally got back to building (between rains). Turned the boat upright and got my first glimpse at what the final form may be.
    [​IMG]

    Next step was to install the inside gunnels.
    [​IMG]
    I then planed the gunnels to the angles I wanted. They decreased in angle towards each end to allow the tumblehome panels to be near horizontal at the stems.
    [​IMG]
    The stem pieces were cut flush so they will fit under the panels.
    [​IMG]

    beekeeper
     
  20. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Temporarily installed the base of the breasthooks/decks but did not like the fit. There was going to be a space created between it and the panel.
    [​IMG]
    Contacted the designer and used a revised framing method. This will support the breasthooks flush with the plywood and will reduce the weight some.
    [​IMG]

    beekeeper
     

Share This Page