1. The forums software has been upgraded and we are still sorting out its quirks.
    Please relay any problems you encounter. Thanks for your patience!
    Dismiss Notice

What Works / What Don't

Discussion in 'Serious Boat Building Questions' started by beekeeper, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Cutting Styrofoam:

    Don't = circler saw unsupported.
    [​IMG]

    Works = pull saw with straight edge board for a guide.
    [​IMG]

    Electric saw could work, but needs more rigging than the simple hand saw.
     
  2. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    Thanks, JD. I've used a utility knife.

    Once, I thought of lesrning karate, and cutting styrofoam with the rock-hard-knife-like edge of my hand. But it hurt, and I cried.
     
  3. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    I have used the knife before but forgot to try it this time.

    My grandson takes karate, maybe I'll get him to try the next time. Probably not a good idea. If the ultimate masters hand hurt he probably would be injured. :lol:

    beekeeper
     
  4. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    The healing treatment for my (severely) injured hand was relatively simple. Grasp a shot glass of single malt scotch, sip it. Repeat as often as necessary.
     
  5. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

  6. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    JD, I appreciate your efforts to present a well set up experiment, free of bias. Good to see.

    On your epoxy joints, I wonder if a tight clamp may have produced a glue starved joint?
     
  7. beekeeper

    beekeeper Well-Known Member

    Jack, they were not my test but seemed to be well done and fair. I think he concluded or suspected the epoxy's poor results may have been related to the cold temperatures. The results are valid for the tests' parameters. All factors have to be considered and evaluated when choosing the best components. I don't think epoxy users need to get worried over these test. We all know epoxy can make a strong joint. How strong is strong enough and/or do I consider other factors?
    I like Titebond 3, so I was pleased it did well.
     
  8. Kayak Jack

    Kayak Jack Well-Known Member

    OK, thanks. Any adhesive that is as strong as, or stronger than, the parent material will partiallytear apart the wood on total destruction. If more strength is required, there will have to be reinfocement added (more material added onto the joint).
     

Share This Page